Hormones
Journal Impact IF - Analysis · Trend · Prediction · Ranking


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Journal Impact IF

2019-2020

1.962

19.4%

Journal Impact IF Trend

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Hormones

The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.962, which is just updated in 2020.

Hormones Impact Factor
Highest IF
2.437
Highest Journal Impact IF

The highest Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 2.437.

Lowest IF
1.19
Lowest Journal Impact IF

The lowest Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.19.

Total Growth Rate
-19.5%
IF Total Growth Rate

The total growth rate of Hormones IF is -19.5%.

Annual Growth Rate
-2.2%
IF Annual Growth Rate

The annual growth rate of Hormones IF is -2.2%.

Journal Impact IF Ranking

Subcategory Quartile Rank Percentile
Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Q3 139/217

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism 36%

Journal Impact IF Ranking

· In the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism research field, the Quartile of Hormones is Q3. Hormones has been ranked #139 over 217 related journals in the Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism research category. The ranking percentile of Hormones is around 36% in the field of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.

Hormones Impact Factor 2020-2021 Prediction

Hormones Impact Factor Predition System

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International Collaboration Trend

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Journal Impact IF History

Year Journal Impact IF
Year Journal Impact IF
2019-2020 1.962
2018-2019 1.643
2017-2018 1.712
2016-2017 1.481
2015-2016 1.19
2014-2015 1.198
2013-2014 1.237
2012-2013 2.013
2011-2012 2.437
Journal Impact IF History

· The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.962
· The 2018-2019 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.643
· The 2017-2018 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.712
· The 2016-2017 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.481
· The 2015-2016 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.19
· The 2014-2015 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.198
· The 2013-2014 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 1.237
· The 2012-2013 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 2.013
· The 2011-2012 Journal Impact IF of Hormones is 2.437

What is Impact Factor?

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly average number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factor values are often deemed to be more important, or carry more intrinsic prestige in their respective fields, than those with lower values.

Hormones | Academic Accelerator - About the Impact Factor

Impact factor is commonly used to evaluate the relative importance of a journal within its field and to measure the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a particular time period. Journal which publishes more review articles will get highest IFs. Journals with higher IFs believed to be more important than those with lower ones. According to Eugene Garfield “impact simply reflects the ability of the journals and editors to attract the best paper available.” Journal which publishes more review articles will get maximum IFs. The Impact Factor of an academic journal is a scientometric Metric that reflects the yearly average number of citations that recent articles published in a given journal received. It is frequently used as a Metric for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher Impact Factor are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The Hormones Impact Factor IF measures the average number of citations received in a particular year (2020) by papers published in the Hormones during the two preceding years (2018-2019). Note that 2020 Impact Factor are reported in 2021; they cannot be calculated until all of the 2020 publications have been processed by the indexing agency. New journals, which are indexed from their first published issue, will receive an impact factor after two years of indexing; in this case, the citations to the year prior to Volume 1, and the number of articles published in the year prior to Volume 1, are known zero values. Journals that are indexed starting with a volume other than the first volume will not get an impact factor until they have been indexed for three years. Occasionally, Journal Citation Reports assigns an impact factor to new journals with less than two years of indexing, based on partial citation data. The calculation always uses two complete and known years of item counts, but for new titles one of the known counts is zero. Annuals and other irregular publications sometimes publish no items in a particular year, affecting the count. The impact factor relates to a specific time period; it is possible to calculate it for any desired period. In addition to the 2-year Impact Factor, the 3-year Impact Factor, 4-year Impact Factor, 5-year Impact Factor, Real-Time Impact Factor can provide further insights and factors into the impact of Hormones.

History

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson ISI was sold to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate, which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Use

The impact factor is used to compare different journals within a certain field. The Web of Science indexes more than 11,500 science and social science journals. Journal impact factors are often used to evaluate the merit of individual articles and individual researchers. This use of impact factors was summarised by Hoeffel:

Impact Factor is not a perfect tool to measure the quality of articles but there is nothing better and it has the advantage of already being in existence and is, therefore, a good technique for scientific evaluation. Experience has shown that in each specialty the best journals are those in which it is most difficult to have an article accepted, and these are the journals that have a high impact factor. Most of these journals existed long before the impact factor was devised. The use of impact factor as a measure of quality is widespread because it fits well with the opinion we have in each field of the best journals in our specialty....In conclusion, prestigious journals publish papers of high level. Therefore, their impact factor is high, and not the contrary.

Eugene Garfield

In brief, Impact factors may be used by:
  • Authors to decide where to submit an article for publication.
  • Libraries to make collection development decisions
  • Academic departments to assess academic productivity
  • Academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
As impact factors are a journal-level metric, rather than an article- or individual-level metric, this use is controversial. Garfield agrees with Hoeffel,but warns about the "misuse in evaluating individuals" because there is "a wide variation [of citations] from article to article within a single journal". Other things to consider about Impact Factors:
  • Many journals do not have an impact factor.
  • The impact factor cannot assess the quality of individual articles. Even if citations were evenly distributed among articles, the impact factor would only measure the interests of other researchers in an article, not its importance and usefulness.
  • Only research articles, technical notes and reviews are “citable” items. Editorials, letters, news items and meeting abstracts are “non-citable items”.
  • Only a small percentage of articles are highly cited and they are found in a small subset of journals. This small proportion accounts for a large percentage of citations.
  • Controversial papers, such as those based on fraudulent data, may be highly cited, distorting the impact factor of a journal.
  • Citation bias may exist. For example, English language resources may be favoured. Authors may cite their own work.
Moreover, informed and careful use of these impact data is essential, and should be based on a thorough understanding of the methodology used to generate impact factors. There are controversial aspects of using impact factors:
  • It is not clear whether the number of times a paper is cited measures its actual quality.
  • Some databases that calculate impact factors fail to incorporate publications including textbooks, handbooks and reference books.
  • Certain disciplines have low numbers of journals and usage. Therefore, one should only compare journals or researchers within the same discipline.
  • Review articles normally are cited more often and therefore can skew results.
  • Self-citing may also skew results.
  • Some resources used to calculate impact factors have inadequate international coverage.
  • Editorial policies can artificially inflate an impact factor.
Impact factors have often been used in advancement and tenure decision-making. Many recognize that this is a coarse tool for such important decisions, and that a multitude of factors should be taken into account in these deliberations. When considering the use of the impact factor (IF), keep these aspects in mind:
  • IF analysis is limited to citations from the journals indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge. Currently, the Web of Science indexes only 8621 journals across the full breadth of the sciences, and just 3121 in the social sciences.
  • A high IF/citation rate says nothing about the quality -- or even, validity -- of the references being cited. Notorious or even retracted articles often attract a lot of attention, hence a high number of citations. The notority related to the first publication on "cold fusion" is one such example.
  • Journals that publish more "review articles" are often found near the top of the rankings. While not known for publishing new, creative findings, these individual articles tend to be heavily cited.
  • The IF measures the average number of citations to articles in the journal -- given this, a small number of highly-cited articles will skew the figure.
  • It takes several years for new journals to be added to the list of titles indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge, so these newer titles will be under-represented.
  • It's alleged that journal editors have learned to "game" the system, encouraging authors to cite their works previously published in the same journal.
Comparing Journals Across Disciplines? Not a good idea! Using Impact Factors within a given discipline should only be done with great care, as described above. Using impact factor data to compare journals across disciplines is even more problematic. Here are some of the reasons:
  • Disciplines where older literature is still referenced, such as Chemistry and Mathematics, offer challenges to the methodolgy since older citations (older than two years) are not used to calculate the impact factor for a given journal. (Five-year impact factor analysis, which can be calculated using the Journal Citation Index database, helps smooth out this problem only to some degree.)
  • Different disciplines have different practices regarding tendency to cite larger numbers of references. Higher overall citation rates will bump upward impact factor measurements.
  • Where it's common for large numbers of authors to collaborate on a single paper, such as in Physics, the tendency of authors to cite themselves (and in this case, more authors) will result in increased citation rates.

Pros and Cons of the Impact Factor

Pros:

  • A vetted, established metric for measuring journal impact within a discipline.
  • Designed to eliminate bias based on journal size and frequency.
Cons:
  • Individual articles makes an uneven contribution to overall Impact Factor.
  • Impact Factor does not account for certain things, things like context (postive or negative citaion) and intentionality (self-citation).
  • The metric is proprietary to and bound by the contents of the Thomson Reuters database.
  • Citations, on which the Impact Factor is based, count for less than 1% of an article's overall use.

Criticism

Numerous critiques have been made regarding the use of impact factors. A 2007 study noted that the most fundamental flaw is that impact factors present the mean of data that are not normally distributed, and suggested that it would be more appropriate to present the median of these data. There is also a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers). Other criticism focuses on the effect of the impact factor on behavior of scholars, editors and other stakeholders. Others have made more general criticisms, arguing that emphasis on impact factor results from negative influence of neoliberal policies on academia claiming that what is needed is not just replacement of the impact factor with more sophisticated metrics for science publications but also discussion on the social value of research assessment and the growing precariousness of scientific careers in higher education.
Experts stress that there are limitations in using impact factors to evaluate a scholar's work. There are many reasons cited for not relying on impact factor alone to evaluate the output of a particular individual. Among these are the following:

  • A single factor is not sufficient for evaluating an author's work.
  • Journal values are meaningless unless compared within the same discipline. Impact factors vary among disciplines.
  • The impact factor was originally devised to show the impact of a specific journal, not a specific scholar. The quality and impact of the author's work may extend beyond the impact of a particular journal.
According to Jim Testa, a researcher for ThomsonReuters Scientific, the most widespread misuse of the Impact Factor is to evaluate the work of an individual author (instead of a journal). "To say that because a researcher is publishing in a certain journal, he or she is more influential or deserves more credit is not necessarily true. There are many other variables to consider." (interview 6/26/2008 in Thomson Reuters blog entry)

Hormones
Journal Profile

About

Hormones-International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism is an international journal published quarterly with an international editorial board aiming at providing a forum covering all fields of endocrinology and metabolic disorders such as disruption of glucose homeostasis (diabetes mellitus), impaired homeostasis of plasma lipids (dyslipidemia), the disorder of bone metabolism (osteoporosis), disturbances of endocrine function and reproductive capacity of women and men.Hormones-International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism particularly encourages clinical, translational and basic science submissions in the areas of endocrine cancers, nutrition, obesity and metabolic disorders, quality of life of endocrine diseases, epidemiology of endocrine and metabolic disorders.

Highly Cited Keywords

ISSN
1109-3099
ISSN

The ISSN of Hormones is 1109-3099 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

ISSN (Online)
2520-8721
ISSN (Online)

The ISSN (Online) of Hormones is 2520-8721 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

Publisher
Springer Verlag
Publisher

Hormones is published by Springer Verlag .

Publication Frequency
-
Publication Frequency

Hormones publishes reports - .

Coverage
2005 - Present
Coverage

The Publication History of Hormones covers 2005 - Present .

Open Access
NO
Open Access

Hormones is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publishers.

Publication Fee
Publication Fee

There is no publication fee for submiting manuscript to Hormones. Hormones is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles.

Language
-
Language

The language of Hormones is - .

Country/Region
Germany
Country/Region

The publisher of Hormones is Springer Verlag , which locates in Germany .

Selected Articles

Full Title Authors
Full Title Authors
Hormonal responses following eccentric exercise in humans Anastassios Philippou · Maria Maridaki · Roxane Tenta · Michael Koutsilieris · Michael Koutsilieris
Combined pituitary hormone deficiency in a girl with 48, XXXX and Rathkes cleft cyst Surabhi Uppal · Youn Hee Jee · Marissa Lightbourne · Joan C. Han · Constantine A. Stratakis · Constantine A. Stratakis
Postprandial dysmetabolism: assessment and treatment Niki Katsiki · Genovefa Kolovou · Genovefa Kolovou
Thyroid hormones: a potential ally to LDL-cholesterol-lowering agents Leonidas H. Duntas · Gabriela Brenta · Gabriela Brenta
The depiction of acromegaly in ancient Greek and Hellenistic art Konstantinos Laios · Maria Zozolou · Konstantinos Markatos · Marianna Karamanou · George Androutsos · George Androutsos
Temozolomide therapy for resistant prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas and carcinomas: a systematic review Mussa H. Almalki · Nora Aljoaib · Maha Alotaibi · Bayan Aldabas · Taibah Wahedi · Fahad Alshahrani · Maswood M. Ahmad · Maswood M. Ahmad
Persistent mullerian duct syndrome: A novel mutation in the AMH gene Ayça Altıncık · Fahri Karaca · Huseyin Onay · Huseyin Onay
Young patient with headache, fever and blurred vision Stavroula A. Paschou · Konstantinos Tzioras · Vasiliki Trianti · Stavroula Lyra · Vasileios-Arsenios Lioutas · Andreas Seretis · Andromachi Vryonidou · Andromachi Vryonidou
Ketogenic diet and testosterone increase: Is the increased cholesterol intake responsible? To what extent and under what circumstances can there be benefits? Heitor Oliveira Santos · Heitor Oliveira Santos
Pegvisomant-primed growth hormone (GH) stimulation test is useful in identifying true GH deficient children Giorgio Radetti · Heba Elsedfy · Randa Khalaf · Cristina Meazza · Sara Pagani · Mohamed El Kholy · Riccardo Albertini · Anna Maria De Stefano · Antonella Navarra · Annalisa De Silvestri · Mauro Bozzola · Mauro Bozzola
The Pineal Gland and its earliest physiological description Konstantinos Laios · Konstantinos Laios
Gut microbiota and obesity: implications for fecal microbiota transplantation therapy Yongbo Kang · Yue Cai · Yue Cai
A case of idiopathic granulomatous hypophysitis Nilufer Ozdemir Kutbay · Mustafa Berker · Figen Soylemezoglu · Hatice Ozisik · Banu Sarer Yurekli · Banu Sarer Yurekli
Medullary thyroid cancer, leukemia, mesothelioma and meningioma, associated with germline APC and RASAL1 variants: a new syndrome? Anna Angelousi · Nikolaos Settas · Fabio R. Faucz · Charalampos Lyssikatos · Martha Quezado · Narjes Nasiri-Ansari · Constantine A. Stratakis · Eva Kassi · Eva Kassi
Detection rate of somatostatin receptor PET in patients with recurrent medullary thyroid carcinoma: a systematic review and a meta-analysis Giorgio Treglia · Adriana Tamburello · Luca Giovanella · Luca Giovanella
The male bride: a story of Sexual Female to Male Transformation at marriage from the Hellenistic period, stored up by Phlegon of Tralles Konstantina Barouti · Georgios K. Markantes · Anastasia K. Armeni · Vasiliki Vasileiou · Neoklis A. Georgopoulos · Neoklis A. Georgopoulos
Muscular effects of vitamin D in young athletes and non-athletes and in the elderly Nikolaos E. Koundourakis · Pavlina D. Avgoustinaki · Niki Malliaraki · Andrew N. Margioris · Andrew N. Margioris
Leydig cell clustering and Reinke crystal distribution in relation to hormonal function in adult patients with testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS) including cryptorchidism Rikke Soerensen · Trine Holm Johannsen · Niels E. Skakkebæk · Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts · Ewa Rajpert-De Meyts
Preoperative markers in differentiated thyroid cancer Alexandra Chrisoulidou · Alexandra Chrisoulidou
Defining optimal vitamin D cut-off levels: The role of parathyroid hormone concentrations Spyridon N. Karras · William B. Grant · Declan P. Naughton · Kalliopi Kotsa · Kalliopi Kotsa
Parathyroid hormone response to severe vitamin D deficiency is associated with femoral neck bone mineral density: an observational study of 405 women with hip-fracture Marco Di Monaco · Carlotta Castiglioni · Rosa Tappero · Rosa Tappero
Somatotropinomas inadequately controlled with octreotide may over-respond to pasireotide: the importance of dose adjustment to achieve long-term biochemical control Ilan Shimon · Wolfgang Saeger · Luiz Eduardo Wildemberg · Mônica R. Gadelha · Mônica R. Gadelha
Identification of an AR Mutation in Klinefelter Syndrome During Evaluation for Penoscrotal Hypospadias Sezer Acar · Hale Tuhan · Elçin Bora · Korcan Demir · Huseyin Onay · Huseyin Onay · Derya Erçal · Ece Böber · Ayhan Abaci · Ayhan Abaci
Menophila: a poetic description of genital ambiguity in Hellenistic literature Anastasia K. Armeni · Danai Georgakopoulou · Georgios K. Markantes · Konstantina Barouti · Leonidas Liarakos · Vasiliki Vasileiou · Neoklis A. Georgopoulos · Neoklis A. Georgopoulos
A novel mutation of the calcium-sensing receptor gene in a German subject with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and primary hyperparathyroidism Marios Papadakis · Natalie Meurer · Theodora Margariti · Anke Meyer · Norbert Weyerbrock · Cornelia Dotzenrath · Cornelia Dotzenrath
GnRH dependent precocious puberty manifested at the age of 14 months in a girl with 47, XXX karyotype Nicos Skordis · Nicos Skordis · Eleana Ferrari · Aria Antoniadou · Leonidas A. Phylactou · Pavlos Fanis · Vassos Neocleous · Vassos Neocleous
Severe osteoporosis with multiple spontaneous vertebral fractures in a young male carrying triple polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor, collagen type 1, and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related peptide 5 genes Maria P. Yavropoulou · Panagoulia Kollia · Dimitris Chatzidimitriou · Stavroula Samara · Lemonia Skoura · John G. Yovos · John G. Yovos
The impact of thyroid autoimmunity (TPOAb) on bone density and fracture risk in postmenopausal women Snezana Polovina · Dragana Miljic · Sladjana Zivojinovic · Natasa Milic · Dragan Micic · Vera Popovic Brkic · Vera Popovic Brkic
Neoadjuvant therapy for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: an emerging issue? Iraklis Perysinakis · Chrysanthi Aggeli · Gregory Kaltsas · George Zografos · George Zografos
Expert consensus on the rational clinical use of PCSK9 inhibitors Evangelos Liberopoulos · Evangelos Liberopoulos
A new TRβ mutation in resistance to thyroid hormone syndrome Corina Neamţu · Claudiu Ţupea · Diana Păun · Anca Hoisescu · Adina Ghemigian · Samuel Refetoff · Chutintorn Sriphrapradang · Chutintorn Sriphrapradang
Cardiovascular safety of type 2 diabetes drugs: evidence review and clinical implications Silvia Paredes · Claudia Matta-Coelho · Ana Margarida Monteiro · Alice Brás · Olinda Marques · Marta Alves · Laura Ribeiro · Laura Ribeiro
Young adult patient with headache, fever and blurred vision Stavroula A. Paschou · Konstantinos Tzioras · Vasiliki Trianti · Stavroula Lyra · Vasileios-Arsenios Lioutas · Andreas Seretis · Andromachi Vryonidou · Andromachi Vryonidou
Emerging treatment modalities for advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors Alessandro Sindoni · Fausto Fama · Maria Gioffrè-Florio · Sergio Baldari · Sergio Baldari
Recent Advances in the Molecular Mechanisms Causing Primary Generalized Glucocorticoid Resistance or Chrousos Syndrome Nicolas C. Nicolaides · Agaristi Lamprokostopoulou · Amalia Sertedaki · Evangelia Charmandari · Evangelia Charmandari
Low-risk papillary thyroid carcinoma patients who underwent near-total thyroidectomy without prophylactic central compartment lymph node dissection and were ablated with low-dose 50mCi RAI had excellent 10-year prognosis Marina Michalaki · Panagiotis Bountouris · Nikolaos D. Roupas · Anastasia Theodoropoulou · Niki Agalianou · Theodoras Alexandrides · Kostas B. Markou · Kostas B. Markou
Calcium homeostasis in women with non-metastatic breast cancer with osteoporosis after a single dose of denosumab: a pilot study Konstantinos A. Toulis · Paschalia K. Iliadou · Stylianos Mandanas · Polyzo Kazila · Efterpi Margaritidou · Konstantinos Georgopoulos · Kalliopi Pazaitou-Panayiotou · Kalliopi Pazaitou-Panayiotou

Hormonal responses following eccentric exercise in humans
Hormones | 2018
Anastassios Philippou · Maria Maridaki · Roxane Tenta · Michael Koutsilieris · Michael Koutsilieris
Combined pituitary hormone deficiency in a girl with 48, XXXX and Rathkes cleft cyst
Hormones | 2017
Surabhi Uppal · Youn Hee Jee · Marissa Lightbourne · Joan C. Han · Constantine A. Stratakis · Constantine A. Stratakis
Postprandial dysmetabolism: assessment and treatment
Hormones | 2017
Niki Katsiki · Genovefa Kolovou · Genovefa Kolovou
The depiction of acromegaly in ancient Greek and Hellenistic art
Hormones | 2017
Konstantinos Laios · Maria Zozolou · Konstantinos Markatos · Marianna Karamanou · George Androutsos · George Androutsos