Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Journal Impact IF - Analysis · Trend · Prediction · Ranking


New

Journal Impact IF

2019-2020

4.413

55.2%

Journal Impact IF Trend

Related Journals

Popular Journals

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 4.413, which is just updated in 2020.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Impact Factor
Highest IF
4.413
Highest Journal Impact IF

The highest Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 4.413.

Lowest IF
2.129
Lowest Journal Impact IF

The lowest Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.129.

Total Growth Rate
3.0%
IF Total Growth Rate

The total growth rate of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy IF is 3.0%.

Annual Growth Rate
0.3%
IF Annual Growth Rate

The annual growth rate of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy IF is 0.3%.

Journal Impact IF Ranking

Subcategory Quartile Rank Percentile
Clinical Psychology Q1 19/275

Clinical Psychology 93%

Journal Impact IF Ranking

· In the Clinical Psychology research field, the Quartile of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is Q1. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been ranked #19 over 275 related journals in the Clinical Psychology research category. The ranking percentile of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is around 93% in the field of Clinical Psychology.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Impact Factor 2020-2021 Prediction

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Impact Factor Predition System

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Impact Factor Prediction System is now online. You can start share your valuable insights with the community.

Predict Check All Preditions
Total Publications
928
Total Citations
27124

Annual Publication Volume

Annual Citation Record

International Collaboration Trend

Cited Documents Trend

Journal Impact IF History

Year Journal Impact IF
Year Journal Impact IF
2019-2020 4.413
2018-2019 2.843
2017-2018 2.802
2016-2017 2.264
2015-2016 2.129
2014-2015 2.508
2013-2014 2.714
2012-2013 2.393
2011-2012 4.283
Journal Impact IF History

· The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 4.413
· The 2018-2019 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.843
· The 2017-2018 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.802
· The 2016-2017 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.264
· The 2015-2016 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.129
· The 2014-2015 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.508
· The 2013-2014 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.714
· The 2012-2013 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 2.393
· The 2011-2012 Journal Impact IF of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 4.283

Publications Cites Dataset

Year Publications Citations
Year Publications Citations
1974 2 1
1975 16 1
1976 14 3
1977 25 1
1978 25 7
1979 11 14
1980 13 15
1981 11 16
1982 13 30
1983 11 28
1984 15 37
1985 14 25
1986 13 66
1987 8 32
1988 16 27
1989 10 37
1990 4 45
1991 13 44
1992 11 49
1993 10 24
1994 10 50
1995 0 38
1996 10 43
1997 13 50
1998 0 67
1999 0 49
2000 0 67
2001 0 62
2002 22 49
2003 21 77
2004 29 173
2005 30 202
2006 26 344
2007 24 508
2008 24 665
2009 36 813
2010 37 1047
2011 34 1368
2012 33 1559
2013 37 1853
2014 32 2279
2015 49 2300
2016 43 2382
2017 29 2361
2018 33 2033
2019 36 2577
2020 48 3367
2021 6 239
Publications Cites Dataset

· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 2 reports and received 1 citations in 1974.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 16 reports and received 1 citations in 1975.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 14 reports and received 3 citations in 1976.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 25 reports and received 1 citations in 1977.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 25 reports and received 7 citations in 1978.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 11 reports and received 14 citations in 1979.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 13 reports and received 15 citations in 1980.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 11 reports and received 16 citations in 1981.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 13 reports and received 30 citations in 1982.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 11 reports and received 28 citations in 1983.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 15 reports and received 37 citations in 1984.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 14 reports and received 25 citations in 1985.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 13 reports and received 66 citations in 1986.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 8 reports and received 32 citations in 1987.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 16 reports and received 27 citations in 1988.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 10 reports and received 37 citations in 1989.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 4 reports and received 45 citations in 1990.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 13 reports and received 44 citations in 1991.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 11 reports and received 49 citations in 1992.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 10 reports and received 24 citations in 1993.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 10 reports and received 50 citations in 1994.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 0 reports and received 38 citations in 1995.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 10 reports and received 43 citations in 1996.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 13 reports and received 50 citations in 1997.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 0 reports and received 67 citations in 1998.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 0 reports and received 49 citations in 1999.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 0 reports and received 67 citations in 2000.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 0 reports and received 62 citations in 2001.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 22 reports and received 49 citations in 2002.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 21 reports and received 77 citations in 2003.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 29 reports and received 173 citations in 2004.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 30 reports and received 202 citations in 2005.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 26 reports and received 344 citations in 2006.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 24 reports and received 508 citations in 2007.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 24 reports and received 665 citations in 2008.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 36 reports and received 813 citations in 2009.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 37 reports and received 1047 citations in 2010.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 34 reports and received 1368 citations in 2011.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 33 reports and received 1559 citations in 2012.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 37 reports and received 1853 citations in 2013.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 32 reports and received 2279 citations in 2014.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 49 reports and received 2300 citations in 2015.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 43 reports and received 2382 citations in 2016.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 29 reports and received 2361 citations in 2017.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 33 reports and received 2033 citations in 2018.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 36 reports and received 2577 citations in 2019.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 48 reports and received 3367 citations in 2020.
· The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has published 6 reports and received 239 citations in 2021.
· The total publications of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 928.
· The total citations of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 27124.

What is Impact Factor?

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly average number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factor values are often deemed to be more important, or carry more intrinsic prestige in their respective fields, than those with lower values.

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy | Academic Accelerator - About the Impact Factor

Impact factor is commonly used to evaluate the relative importance of a journal within its field and to measure the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a particular time period. Journal which publishes more review articles will get highest IFs. Journals with higher IFs believed to be more important than those with lower ones. According to Eugene Garfield “impact simply reflects the ability of the journals and editors to attract the best paper available.” Journal which publishes more review articles will get maximum IFs. The Impact Factor of an academic journal is a scientometric Metric that reflects the yearly average number of citations that recent articles published in a given journal received. It is frequently used as a Metric for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher Impact Factor are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Impact Factor IF measures the average number of citations received in a particular year (2020) by papers published in the Cognitive Behaviour Therapy during the two preceding years (2018-2019). Note that 2020 Impact Factor are reported in 2021; they cannot be calculated until all of the 2020 publications have been processed by the indexing agency. New journals, which are indexed from their first published issue, will receive an impact factor after two years of indexing; in this case, the citations to the year prior to Volume 1, and the number of articles published in the year prior to Volume 1, are known zero values. Journals that are indexed starting with a volume other than the first volume will not get an impact factor until they have been indexed for three years. Occasionally, Journal Citation Reports assigns an impact factor to new journals with less than two years of indexing, based on partial citation data. The calculation always uses two complete and known years of item counts, but for new titles one of the known counts is zero. Annuals and other irregular publications sometimes publish no items in a particular year, affecting the count. The impact factor relates to a specific time period; it is possible to calculate it for any desired period. In addition to the 2-year Impact Factor, the 3-year Impact Factor, 4-year Impact Factor, 5-year Impact Factor, Real-Time Impact Factor can provide further insights and factors into the impact of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy.

History

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson ISI was sold to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate, which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Use

The impact factor is used to compare different journals within a certain field. The Web of Science indexes more than 11,500 science and social science journals. Journal impact factors are often used to evaluate the merit of individual articles and individual researchers. This use of impact factors was summarised by Hoeffel:

Impact Factor is not a perfect tool to measure the quality of articles but there is nothing better and it has the advantage of already being in existence and is, therefore, a good technique for scientific evaluation. Experience has shown that in each specialty the best journals are those in which it is most difficult to have an article accepted, and these are the journals that have a high impact factor. Most of these journals existed long before the impact factor was devised. The use of impact factor as a measure of quality is widespread because it fits well with the opinion we have in each field of the best journals in our specialty....In conclusion, prestigious journals publish papers of high level. Therefore, their impact factor is high, and not the contrary.

Eugene Garfield

In brief, Impact factors may be used by:
  • Authors to decide where to submit an article for publication.
  • Libraries to make collection development decisions
  • Academic departments to assess academic productivity
  • Academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
As impact factors are a journal-level metric, rather than an article- or individual-level metric, this use is controversial. Garfield agrees with Hoeffel,but warns about the "misuse in evaluating individuals" because there is "a wide variation [of citations] from article to article within a single journal". Other things to consider about Impact Factors:
  • Many journals do not have an impact factor.
  • The impact factor cannot assess the quality of individual articles. Even if citations were evenly distributed among articles, the impact factor would only measure the interests of other researchers in an article, not its importance and usefulness.
  • Only research articles, technical notes and reviews are “citable” items. Editorials, letters, news items and meeting abstracts are “non-citable items”.
  • Only a small percentage of articles are highly cited and they are found in a small subset of journals. This small proportion accounts for a large percentage of citations.
  • Controversial papers, such as those based on fraudulent data, may be highly cited, distorting the impact factor of a journal.
  • Citation bias may exist. For example, English language resources may be favoured. Authors may cite their own work.
Moreover, informed and careful use of these impact data is essential, and should be based on a thorough understanding of the methodology used to generate impact factors. There are controversial aspects of using impact factors:
  • It is not clear whether the number of times a paper is cited measures its actual quality.
  • Some databases that calculate impact factors fail to incorporate publications including textbooks, handbooks and reference books.
  • Certain disciplines have low numbers of journals and usage. Therefore, one should only compare journals or researchers within the same discipline.
  • Review articles normally are cited more often and therefore can skew results.
  • Self-citing may also skew results.
  • Some resources used to calculate impact factors have inadequate international coverage.
  • Editorial policies can artificially inflate an impact factor.
Impact factors have often been used in advancement and tenure decision-making. Many recognize that this is a coarse tool for such important decisions, and that a multitude of factors should be taken into account in these deliberations. When considering the use of the impact factor (IF), keep these aspects in mind:
  • IF analysis is limited to citations from the journals indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge. Currently, the Web of Science indexes only 8621 journals across the full breadth of the sciences, and just 3121 in the social sciences.
  • A high IF/citation rate says nothing about the quality -- or even, validity -- of the references being cited. Notorious or even retracted articles often attract a lot of attention, hence a high number of citations. The notority related to the first publication on "cold fusion" is one such example.
  • Journals that publish more "review articles" are often found near the top of the rankings. While not known for publishing new, creative findings, these individual articles tend to be heavily cited.
  • The IF measures the average number of citations to articles in the journal -- given this, a small number of highly-cited articles will skew the figure.
  • It takes several years for new journals to be added to the list of titles indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge, so these newer titles will be under-represented.
  • It's alleged that journal editors have learned to "game" the system, encouraging authors to cite their works previously published in the same journal.
Comparing Journals Across Disciplines? Not a good idea! Using Impact Factors within a given discipline should only be done with great care, as described above. Using impact factor data to compare journals across disciplines is even more problematic. Here are some of the reasons:
  • Disciplines where older literature is still referenced, such as Chemistry and Mathematics, offer challenges to the methodolgy since older citations (older than two years) are not used to calculate the impact factor for a given journal. (Five-year impact factor analysis, which can be calculated using the Journal Citation Index database, helps smooth out this problem only to some degree.)
  • Different disciplines have different practices regarding tendency to cite larger numbers of references. Higher overall citation rates will bump upward impact factor measurements.
  • Where it's common for large numbers of authors to collaborate on a single paper, such as in Physics, the tendency of authors to cite themselves (and in this case, more authors) will result in increased citation rates.

Pros and Cons of the Impact Factor

Pros:

  • A vetted, established metric for measuring journal impact within a discipline.
  • Designed to eliminate bias based on journal size and frequency.
Cons:
  • Individual articles makes an uneven contribution to overall Impact Factor.
  • Impact Factor does not account for certain things, things like context (postive or negative citaion) and intentionality (self-citation).
  • The metric is proprietary to and bound by the contents of the Thomson Reuters database.
  • Citations, on which the Impact Factor is based, count for less than 1% of an article's overall use.

Criticism

Numerous critiques have been made regarding the use of impact factors. A 2007 study noted that the most fundamental flaw is that impact factors present the mean of data that are not normally distributed, and suggested that it would be more appropriate to present the median of these data. There is also a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers). Other criticism focuses on the effect of the impact factor on behavior of scholars, editors and other stakeholders. Others have made more general criticisms, arguing that emphasis on impact factor results from negative influence of neoliberal policies on academia claiming that what is needed is not just replacement of the impact factor with more sophisticated metrics for science publications but also discussion on the social value of research assessment and the growing precariousness of scientific careers in higher education.
Experts stress that there are limitations in using impact factors to evaluate a scholar's work. There are many reasons cited for not relying on impact factor alone to evaluate the output of a particular individual. Among these are the following:

  • A single factor is not sufficient for evaluating an author's work.
  • Journal values are meaningless unless compared within the same discipline. Impact factors vary among disciplines.
  • The impact factor was originally devised to show the impact of a specific journal, not a specific scholar. The quality and impact of the author's work may extend beyond the impact of a particular journal.
According to Jim Testa, a researcher for ThomsonReuters Scientific, the most widespread misuse of the Impact Factor is to evaluate the work of an individual author (instead of a journal). "To say that because a researcher is publishing in a certain journal, he or she is more influential or deserves more credit is not necessarily true. There are many other variables to consider." (interview 6/26/2008 in Thomson Reuters blog entry)

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy
Journal Profile

About

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is a peer reviewed, multidisciplinary journal devoted to the application of behavioural and cognitive sciences to clinical psychology and psychotherapy.The journal publishes state-of-the-art scientific articles within: clinical and health psychology; psychopathology; behavioural medicine; assessment; treatment; theoretical issues pertinent to behavioural, cognitive and combined cognitive behavioural therapies None

Highly Cited Keywords

ISSN
1650-6073
ISSN

The ISSN of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 1650-6073 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

ISSN (Online)
1651-2316
ISSN (Online)

The ISSN (Online) of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is 1651-2316 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

Publisher
Taylor and Francis AS
Publisher

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is published by Taylor and Francis AS .

Publication Frequency
Quarterly
Publication Frequency

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy publishes reports Quarterly .

Coverage
2002 - Present
Coverage

The Publication History of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy covers 2002 - Present .

Open Access
NO
Open Access

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publishers.

Publication Fee
Publication Fee

There is no publication fee for submiting manuscript to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles.

Language
English
Language

The language of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is English .

Country/Region
Sweden
Country/Region

The publisher of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy is Taylor and Francis AS , which locates in Sweden .

Selected Articles

Full Title Authors
Full Title Authors
Brief report: sudden gains in cognitive-behavioral group therapy and group psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder among college students Audur Thorisdottir · Arnrun Tryggvadottir · Saevar Thor Saevarsson · Andri S. Bjornsson · Andri S. Bjornsson
Insomnia and eating expectancies among college students: the role of emotion dysregulation Brooke Y. Kauffman · Jafar Bakhshaie · Hantin Lam · Candice A. Alfano · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Individually tailored internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults with anxiety and depression: a randomised controlled trial Kristin Silfvernagel · Anna Westlinder · Stina Andersson · Kajsa Bergman · Rosario Diaz Hernandez · Line Fallhagen · Ida Lundqvist · Nicole Masri · Linda Viberg · Marie-Louise Forsberg · Maria Lind · Thomas Berger · Per Carlbring · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson
The effects of clinical supervision on supervisees and patients in cognitive behavioral therapy: a systematic review Sven Alfonsson · Thomas Parling · Åsa Spännargård · Gerhard Andersson · Tobias Lundgren · Tobias Lundgren
A longitudinal assessment of the road to mental readiness training among municipal police R. Nicholas Carleton · Stephanie Korol · Julia E. Mason · Kadie Hozempa · Gregory S. Anderson · Nicholas A. Jones · Keith S. Dobson · Andrew Szeto · Suzanne Bailey · Suzanne Bailey
Interactive effects of cumulative lifetime traumatic brain injuries and combat exposure on posttraumatic stress among deployed military personnel Brian J. Albanese · Richard J. Macatee · Lauren A. Stentz · Norman B. Schmidt · Craig J. Bryan · Craig J. Bryan
Influence of adjuvant mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) on symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans – results from a randomized control study Mostafa Jasbi · Dena Sadeghi Bahmani · Dena Sadeghi Bahmani · Gholamreza Karami · Maryam Omidbeygi · Maryam Peyravi · Ailin Panahi · Jafar Mirzaee · Edith Holsboer-Trachsler · Serge Brand · Serge Brand · Serge Brand
Do eating disorder voice characteristics predict treatment outcomes in anorexia nervosa? A pilot study Emma Hormoz · Matthew Pugh · Glenn Waller · Glenn Waller
Differences in baseline and process variables between non-responders and responders in Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for chronic tinnitus Thomas Probst · Cornelia Weise · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson · Maria Kleinstäuber · Maria Kleinstäuber
Anxiety sensitivity and attentional bias to threat interact to prospectively predict anxiety Joseph R. Bardeen · Thomas A. Daniel · Thomas A. Daniel
Increasing intolerance of uncertainty over time: the potential influence of increasing connectivity R. Nicholas Carleton · Gabrielle Desgagné · Rachel Krakauer · Ryan Y. Hong · Ryan Y. Hong
Anxiety sensitivity cognitive concerns drive the relation between anxiety sensitivity and symptoms of depression Kevin G. Saulnier · Nicholas P. Allan · Amanda M. Raines · Norman B. Schmidt · Norman B. Schmidt
Internet-based acceptance and commitment therapy for psychological distress experienced by people with hearing problems: a pilot randomized controlled trial Peter Molander · Hugo Hesser · Sandra Weineland · Kajsa Bergwall · Sonia Buck · Johan Jäder Malmlöf · Henning Lantz · Thomas Lunner · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson
Development and evaluation of a scale assessing therapist fidelity to guidelines for delivering therapist-assisted Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy Heather D. Hadjistavropoulos · Luke H. Schneider · Kristen Klassen · Blake F. Dear · Nickolai Titov · Nickolai Titov
Strategies included in cognitive behavioral therapy programs to treat internalized disorders: a systematic review Catherine Fréchette-Simard · Isabelle Plante · Jonathan Bluteau · Jonathan Bluteau
Meta-analysis of the efficacy and acceptability of cognitive-behavioural therapy for Arab adult populations experiencing anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder Rony Kayrouz · Blake F. Dear · Bechara Kayrouz · Eyal Karin · Milena Gandy · Nickolai Titov · Nickolai Titov
Can the REBT theory explain loneliness? Theoretical and clinical applications Philip Hyland · Philip Hyland · Gráinne McGinty · Thanos Karatzias · Jamie Murphy · Frédérique Vallières · Joanna E. McHugh Power · Joanna E. McHugh Power
Augmenting treatment efficiency in exposure therapy for PTSD: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of yohimbine HCl Peter W. Tuerk · Bethany C. Wangelin · Mark B. Powers · Jasper A. J. Smits · Ron Acierno · Ursula S. Myers · Scott P. Orr · Edna B. Foa · Mark B. Hamner · Mark B. Hamner
Linguistic analysis of patients with mood and anxiety disorders during cognitive behavioral therapy Anke R. Sonnenschein · Stefan G. Hofmann · Tobias Ziegelmayer · Wolfgang Lutz · Wolfgang Lutz
Identifying the role of sociodemographic factors in major depressive disorder and suicidality among Spanish-speaking Latino patients in a federally qualified health center Andrew H. Rogers · Nicole A. Short · Zuzuky Robles · Jafar Bakhshaie · Andres G. Viana · Norman B. Schmidt · Monica Garza · Melissa Ochoa-Perez · Chad Lemaire · Daniel Bogiaizian · Angela Medvedeva · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Positive memory enhancement training for individuals with major depressive disorder Kimberly A. Arditte Hall · Rudi De Raedt · Kiara R. Timpano · Jutta Joormann · Jutta Joormann
A preliminary examination of the role of psychotherapist fidelity on outcomes of cognitive processing therapy during an RCT for military sexual trauma-related PTSD Nicholas Holder · Ryan Holliday · Rush Williams · Kacy Mullen · Alina Surís · Alina Surís
Advancing cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression Paul Sadler · Suzanne McLaren · Britt Klein · Megan Jenkins · Megan Jenkins
A topographical map approach to representing treatment efficacy: a focus on positive psychology interventions Eugenia I. Gorlin · Josephine Lee · Michael W. Otto · Michael W. Otto
Increased skills usage statistically mediates symptom reduction in self-guided internet-delivered cognitive–behavioural therapy for depression and anxiety: a randomised controlled trial Matthew D. Terides · Blake F. Dear · Vincent J. Fogliati · Milena Gandy · Eyal Karin · Michael P. Jones · Nickolai Titov · Nickolai Titov
The implementation of guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a routine-care setting: effectiveness and implementation efforts Tine Nordgreen · Rolf Gjestad · Gerhard Andersson · Per Carlbring · Odd E. Havik · Odd E. Havik
Adherence predictors in an Internet-based Intervention program for depression Adoración Castro · Yolanda López-del-Hoyo · Christian Peake · Fermín Mayoral · Cristina Botella · Javier García-Campayo · Rosa M. Baños · Raquel Nogueira-Arjona · Miquel Roca · Margalida Gili · Margalida Gili
Reduction of anxiety sensitivity in relation to nicotine withdrawal symptoms during smoking cessation: an examination among successful quitters Jafar Bakhshaie · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Kirsten J. Langdon · Kirsten J. Langdon · Adam M. Leventhal · Norman B. Schmidt · Norman B. Schmidt
A transdiagnostic examination of decreased intolerance of uncertainty and treatment outcome Kimberly T. Stevens · Travis Rogers · Moselle Campbell · Thröstur Björgvinsson · Sarah J. Kertz · Sarah J. Kertz
Emotional distress and tobacco demand during the menstrual cycle in female smokers Samantha G. Farris · Samantha G. Farris · Samantha G. Farris · Ana M. Abrantes · Ana M. Abrantes · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Mediation analyses of Internet-facilitated cognitive behavioral intervention for maternal depression John R. Seeley · Lisa Sheeber · Edward G. Feil · Craig Leve · Betsy Davis · Erik Sorensen · Steve Allan · Steve Allan
A meta-analytic review of cognitive processing therapy for adults with posttraumatic stress disorder Gordon J.G. Asmundson · Audur S. Thorisdottir · Jacob W. Roden-Foreman · Scarlett O. Baird · Sara M. Witcraft · Aliza T. Stein · Jasper A. J. Smits · Mark B. Powers · Mark B. Powers · Mark B. Powers
Meta-analysis of the effects of third-wave behavioural interventions on disordered eating and body image concerns: implications for eating disorder prevention Jake Linardon · John Gleeson · Keong Yap · Kylie Murphy · Leah Brennan · Leah Brennan
Exposure-based cognitive behavior therapy for atopic dermatitis: an open trial Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf · Anna Bergman · Nils Lindefors · Maria Bradley · Maria Bradley
Moderators and predictors of outcomes in telephone delivered compared to face-to-face cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric obsessive–compulsive disorder: preliminary evidence from a non-inferiority RCT A. Nair · Cynthia Turner · Cynthia Turner · Isobel Heyman · David Mataix-Cols · Karina Lovell · Georgina Krebs · Katie Lang · Sarah Byford · R. O’Kearney · R. O’Kearney
Comparing cognitive fusion and cognitive reappraisal as predictors of college student mental health Jennifer Krafft · Jack Haeger · Michael E. Levin · Michael E. Levin
Predictors of improvement in an open-trial multisite evaluation of emotion regulation group therapy Hanna Sahlin · Hanna Sahlin · Johan Bjureberg · Johan Bjureberg · Kim L. Gratz · Matthew T. Tull · Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf · Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf · Jonas Bjärehed · Jussi Jokinen · Jussi Jokinen · Lars-Gunnar Lundh · Clara Hellner · Brjánn Ljótsson · Brjánn Ljótsson · Brjánn Ljótsson
Look before you leap: the role of negative urgency in appraisals of ambiguous and unambiguous scenarios in individuals high in generalized anxiety disorder symptoms Bailee L. Malivoire · Michelle Marcos · Elizabeth J. Pawluk · Kathleen Tallon · Andrea Kusec · Naomi Koerner · Naomi Koerner
Predictors and consequences of sudden gains in transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders Lisa Vincent · Peter J. Norton · Peter J. Norton
The predictive capacity of self-reported motivation vs. early observed motivational language in cognitive behavioural therapy for generalized anxiety disorder Lauren E. Poulin · Melissa L. Button · Henny A. Westra · Michael J. Constantino · Martin M. Antony · Martin M. Antony
Phobie à deuxand other reasons why clinicians do not apply exposure with response prevention in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder Steffen Moritz · Anne Katrin Külz · Ulrich Voderholzer · Thomas Hillebrand · Dean McKay · Lena Jelinek · Lena Jelinek
Relationships between health behaviors, posttraumatic stress disorder, and comorbid general anxiety and depression Julia E. Mason · Daniel M. LeBouthillier · Gordon J.G. Asmundson · Gordon J.G. Asmundson
Internet-based vs. face-to-face cognitive behavior therapy for psychiatric and somatic disorders: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis Per Carlbring · Gerhard Andersson · Pim Cuijpers · Heleen Riper · Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf · Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf
Executive attention moderates the effect of trait anxiety on hyperarousal symptoms Kelsi A. Clayson · Joseph R. Bardeen · Sara L. Dolan · Thomas A. Fergus · Thomas A. Fergus
Comparing in-the-moment skill coaching effects from tailored versus non-tailored acceptance and commitment therapy mobile apps in a non-clinical sample Michael E. Levin · Cynthia Navarro · Rick A. Cruz · Jack Haeger · Jack Haeger
A placebo-controlled randomized trial of D-cycloserine augmentation of cue exposure therapy for smoking cessation Michael W. Otto · Gladys N. Pachas · Corinne Cather · Susanne S. Hoeppner · Samantha J. Moshier · Bridget A. Hearon · Heather Burrell Ward · Alexandra Laffer · Jasper A. J. Smits · A. Eden Evins · A. Eden Evins
The Bergen 4-day treatment for OCD: four years follow-up of concentrated ERP in a clinical mental health setting Bjarne Hansen · Bjarne Hansen · Gerd Kvale · Gerd Kvale · Kristen Hagen · Audun Havnen · Lars-Göran Öst · Lars-Göran Öst · Lars-Göran Öst
Social support, negative social exchange, and response to case formulation-based cognitive behavior therapy Polina Eidelman · Alexandra Jensen · Lance M. Rappaport · Lance M. Rappaport
Efficacy of brief guided self-help cognitive behavioral treatment for perfectionism in reducing perinatal depression and anxiety: a randomized controlled trial Talitha A. Lowndes · Sarah J. Egan · Peter M. McEvoy · Peter M. McEvoy
Phone coaching in Dialectical Behavior Therapy: frequency and relationship to client variables Pedro N. Oliveira · Shireen L. Rizvi · Shireen L. Rizvi
The role of personal practice in therapist skill development: a model to guide therapists, educators, supervisors and researchers James Bennett-Levy · Amy Finlay-Jones · Amy Finlay-Jones
Pain-related anxiety and opioid misuse in a racially/ethnically diverse young adult sample with moderate/severe pain Andrew H. Rogers · Jafar Bakhshaie · Hantin Lam · Kirsten J. Langdon · Kirsten J. Langdon · Joseph W. Ditre · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Meta-analysis of the effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy on the core eating disorder maintaining mechanisms: implications for mechanisms of therapeutic change Jake Linardon · Jake Linardon
A new look at the schema therapy model: organization and role of early maladaptive schemas Bo Bach · George Lockwood · Jeffrey E. Young · Jeffrey E. Young
Association splitting of the sexual orientation-OCD-relevant semantic network Terence H. W. Ching · Monnica T. Williams · Monnica T. Williams
Anxiety sensitivity moderates the painful effects of feeling burdensome to others Angie S. LeRoy · Qian Lu · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Jeffrey Ramirez · Christopher P. Fagundes · Christopher P. Fagundes · Christopher P. Fagundes · Christopher P. Fagundes
Worry and anxiety account for unique variance in the relationship between intolerance of uncertainty and depression Michaela B. Swee · Thomas M. Olino · Richard G. Heimberg · Richard G. Heimberg
A measure of perceived pain and tobacco smoking interrelations: pilot validation of the pain and smoking inventory Joseph W. Ditre · Emily L. Zale · Bryan W. Heckman · Peter S. Hendricks · Peter S. Hendricks
Whats in a name? Intolerance of uncertainty, other uncertainty-relevant constructs, and their differential relations to worry and generalized anxiety disorder* Naomi Koerner · Teresa Mejia · Andrea Kusec · Andrea Kusec
Impact of imagery rescripting on adverse self-defining memories and post-recall working selves in a non-clinical sample: a pilot study Soljana Çili · Sharon Pettit · Lusia Stopa · Lusia Stopa
Online attention modification for social anxiety disorder: replication of a randomized controlled trial R. Nicholas Carleton · Michelle J. N. Teale Sapach · Chris Oriet · Daniel M. LeBouthillier · Daniel M. LeBouthillier
Emotion regulation strategies in daily life: mindfulness, cognitive reappraisal and emotion suppression Robert Brockman · Joseph Ciarrochi · Philip D. Parker · Todd B. Kashdan · Todd B. Kashdan
Group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for bipolar disorder and co-existing anxiety – an open pilot study Sara Pankowski · Mats Adler · Gerhard Andersson · Nils Lindefors · Cecilia Svanborg · Cecilia Svanborg
Effect of treatments for depression on quality of life: a meta-analysis* Stefan G. Hofmann · Joshua Curtiss · Joseph K. Carpenter · Shelley Kind · Shelley Kind
Secondary traumatic stress in emergency medicine clinicians Jacob W. Roden-Foreman · Monica Bennett · Evan Elizabeth Rainey · John S. Garrett · Mark B. Powers · Ann Marie Warren · Ann Marie Warren
Creating state of the art, next-generation Virtual Reality exposure therapies for anxiety disorders using consumer hardware platforms: design considerations and future directions Philip Lindner · Alexander Miloff · William Hamilton · Lena Reuterskiöld · Gerhard Andersson · Mark B. Powers · Per Carlbring · Per Carlbring
Intrusive thoughts in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder and non-clinical participants: a comparison using the International Intrusive Thought Interview Schedule Martine Bouvard · Nathalie Fournet · Anne Denis · Adelaide Sixdenier · David A. Clark · David A. Clark
Internet-delivered transdiagnostic and tailored cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety and depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Costina R. Păsărelu · Gerhard Andersson · Lise Bergman Nordgren · Anca Dobrean · Anca Dobrean
Cognitive behavioral therapy in practice: therapist perceptions of techniques, outcome measures, practitioner qualifications, and relation to research Benjamin Bohman · Alberto Santi · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson
Swedish Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (SAAQ): a psychometric evaluation Tobias Lundgren · Thomas Parling · Thomas Parling
Factor solutions of the Social Phobia Scale (SPS) and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS) in a Swedish population Ewa Mörtberg · Lena Reuterskiöld · Maria Tillfors · Tomas Furmark · Lars-Göran Öst · Lars-Göran Öst
Are we certain about which measure of intolerance of uncertainty to use yet Vincenzo Roma · Debra A. Hope · Debra A. Hope
Synergistic effects of pain and alcohol use in relation to depressive and anxiety symptoms among Latinos in primary care Daniel J. Paulus · Andres G. Viana · Joseph W. Ditre · Jafar Bakhshaie · Monica Garza · Jodi Berger Cardoso · Jeanette Valdivieso · Melissa Ochoa-Perez · Chad Lemaire · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Focus-of-attention behavioral experiment: an examination of a therapeutic procedure to reduce social anxiety Kerry A. Renner · David P. Valentiner · Jacob B. Holzman · Jacob B. Holzman
Associations between lower order anxiety sensitivity dimensions and DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms Amanda M. Raines · Jessica L. Walton · Eliza S. McManus · Lisa-Ann J. Cuccurullo · Jessica L. Chambliss · Madeline Uddo · C. Laurel Franklin · C. Laurel Franklin
Therapist empathy, homework compliance, and outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy for generalized anxiety disorder: partitioning within- and between-therapist effects Kimberley M. Hara · Adi Aviram · Michael J. Constantino · Henny A. Westra · Martin M. Antony · Martin M. Antony
The latent structure of social anxiety disorder and the performance only specifier: a taxometric analysis Grace B. Boyers · Joshua J. Broman-Fulks · David P. Valentiner · Kathleen S. McCraw · Lisa Curtin · Kurt D. Michael · Kurt D. Michael
The interaction of distress tolerance and intolerance of uncertainty in the prediction of symptom reduction across CBT for social anxiety disorder Danielle Katz · Neil A. Rector · Judith M. Laposa · Judith M. Laposa
Efficacy of guided self-help behavioural activation and physical activity for depression: a randomized controlled trial Isabelle Soucy · Martin D. Provencher · Michelle Fortier · Taylor McFadden · Taylor McFadden
Is cognitive behavioural therapy effective in reducing suicidal ideation and behaviour when delivered face-to-face or via e-health? A systematic review and meta-analysis Katie Leavey · Russell Hawkins · Russell Hawkins
Violent obsessions are associated with suicidality in an OCD analog sample of college students Terence H. W. Ching · Monnica T. Williams · Jedidiah Siev · Jedidiah Siev
Therapeutic response to Cognitive Processing Therapy in White and Black female veterans with military sexual trauma-related PTSD Ryan Holliday · Nicholas Holder · Meredith L. C. Williamson · Alina Surís · Alina Surís
Transdiagnostic group CBT for anxiety disorders: the unified protocol in mental health services Nina Reinholt · Ruth Aharoni · Clas Winding · Nicole Rosenberg · Bent Rosenbaum · Sidse Marie Arnfred · Sidse Marie Arnfred
App-guided exposure and response prevention for obsessive compulsive disorder: an open pilot trial Christina L. Boisseau · Carly M. Schwartzman · Jessica Lawton · Maria C. Mancebo · Maria C. Mancebo
Linking attentional control and PTSD symptom severity: the role of rumination Rebecca C. Cox · Bunmi O. Olatunji · Bunmi O. Olatunji
Acceptance- and mindfulness-based interventions for the treatment of chronic pain: a meta-analytic review M.M. Veehof · H.R. Trompetter · Ernst Thomas Bohlmeijer · Karlein Maria Gertrudis Schreurs · Karlein Maria Gertrudis Schreurs
The Effects of Transdiagnostic Group CBT for Anxiety on Insomnia Symptoms Sarah Kate McGowan · Emmanuel P. Espejo · Noelle Balliett · Emily A. Werdowatz · Emily A. Werdowatz
The frequency of actions and thoughts scale: development and psychometric validation of a measure of adaptive behaviours and cognitions Matthew D. Terides · Blake F. Dear · Eyal Karin · Michael P. Jones · Milena Gandy · Vincent J. Fogliati · Rony Kayrouz · Lauren G. Staples · Nickolai Titov · Nickolai Titov
Technology: Bridging the Gap from Research to Practice Mark B. Powers · Per Carlbring · Per Carlbring
The Brunnsviken Brief Quality of Life Scale (BBQ): Development and Psychometric Evaluation Philip Lindner · Ola Frykheden · David Forsström · Erik Andersson · Brjánn Ljótsson · Erik Hedman · Gerhard Andersson · Per Carlbring · Per Carlbring
Letting go of yesterday: Effect of distraction on post-event processing and anticipatory anxiety in a socially anxious sample Rebecca A. Blackie · Nancy L. Kocovski · Nancy L. Kocovski
Internet-provided cognitive behaviour therapy of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth-a randomized controlled trial Katri Nieminen · Ida Berg · Katri Frankenstein · Lina Viita · Kamilla Larsson · Ulrika Persson · Loviisa Spånberger · Anna Wretman · Kristin Silfvernagel · Gerhard Andersson · Klaas Wijma · Klaas Wijma
Intolerance of uncertainty, causal uncertainty, causal importance, self-concept clarity and their relations to generalized anxiety disorder Andrea Kusec · Kathleen Tallon · Naomi Koerner · Naomi Koerner
Hoarding Disorder and a Systematic Review of Treatment with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Monnica T. Williams · Jenifer A. Viscusi · Jenifer A. Viscusi
Transdiagnostic treatments for children and adolescents Araceli Gonzalez · Araceli Gonzalez
Psychometric properties of the mini-social phobia inventory (Mini-SPIN) in a large online treatment-seeking sample Vincent J. Fogliati · Matthew D. Terides · Milena Gandy · Lauren G. Staples · Luke Johnston · Eyal Karin · Ronald M. Rapee · Nickolai Titov · Blake F. Dear · Blake F. Dear
Exposure-based Interventions for the management of individuals with high levels of needle fear across the lifespan: a clinical practice guideline and call for further research C. Meghan McMurtry · Anna Taddio · Melanie Noel · Martin M. Antony · Christine T. Chambers · Gordon J.G. Asmundson · Rebecca Pillai Riddell · Vibhuti Shah · Noni E. MacDonald · Jess Rogers · Lucie Marisa Bucci · Patricia Mousmanis · Eddy Lang · Scott A. Halperin · Susan K. Bowles · Christine Halpert · Moshe Ipp · Michael J. Rieder · Kate Robson · Elizabeth Uleryk · Elizabeth Votta Bleeker · Vinita Dubey · Anita Hanrahan · Donna Lockett · Jeffrey Scott · Jeffrey Scott
Examining the Panic Attack Specifier in Social Anxiety Disorder Nicholas P. Allan · Mary E. Oglesby · Nicole A. Short · Norman B. Schmidt · Norman B. Schmidt
Testing the Bivalent Fear of Evaluation Model of Social Anxiety: The Relationship between Fear of Positive Evaluation, Social Anxiety, and Perfectionism Keong Yap · Amy Gibbs · Andrew Francis · Sharynn Schuster · Sharynn Schuster
Imagery rescripting of revenge, avoidance, and forgiveness for past bullying experiences in young adults Hayley Watson · Ronald M. Rapee · Natasha Todorov · Natasha Todorov
Audio Feedback with Reduced Self-focus as an Intervention for Social Anxiety: An Experimental Study Jan-Erik Nilsson · Lars-Gunnar Lundh · Lars-Gunnar Lundh
The Relationship between Traumatic Life Events and Hoarding Symptoms: A Multi-Method Approach Ashley M. Shaw · Sara M. Witcraft · Kiara R. Timpano · Kiara R. Timpano
Does emotional reasoning change during cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety David Berle · Michelle L. Moulds · Starcevic · Denise Milicevic · Anthony J. Hannan · Erin Dale · Kirupamani Viswasam · Brakoulias · Brakoulias
Cognitive schemas as longitudinal predictors of self-reported adolescent depressive symptoms and resilience Jordan S. Friedmann · Margaret N. Lumley · Bethany Lerman · Bethany Lerman
Relations among Social Anxiety, Eye Contact Avoidance, State Anxiety, and Perception of Interaction Performance during a Live Conversation Ashley N. Howell · Devin A. Zibulsky · Akanksha Srivastav · Justin W. Weeks · Justin W. Weeks
Internet-based self-help treatment for panic disorder: a randomized controlled trial comparing mandatory versus optional complementary psychological support Pablo Oromendia · Jorge Orrego · Albert Bonillo · Beatriz Molinuevo · Beatriz Molinuevo
Social anxiety and vulnerability for problematic drinking in college students: the moderating role of post-event processing Carrie M. Potter · Todd Galbraith · Dane Jensen · Amanda S. Morrison · Richard G. Heimberg · Richard G. Heimberg
Self-help interventions for adjustment disorder problems: a randomized waiting-list controlled study in a sample of burglary victims Rahel Bachem · Andreas Maercker · Andreas Maercker
Exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy for irritable bowel syndrome : A single-case experimental design across 13 subjects Katja Boersma · Brjánn Ljótsson · Hanna Edebol-Carlman · Martien Schrooten · Steven J. Linton · Robert-Jan M. Brummer · Robert-Jan M. Brummer
Are all safety behaviours created equal? A comparison of novel and routinely used safety behaviours in obsessive-compulsive disorder Hannah C. Levy · Adam S. Radomsky · Adam S. Radomsky
Development and validation of the Shy Bladder and Bowel Scale (SBBS) Simon R. Knowles · Jason Skues · Jason Skues
Exploring linguistic correlates of social anxiety in romantic stories Katya C. Fernandez · Elizabeth A. Gordon · Thomas L. Rodebaugh · Richard G. Heimberg · Richard G. Heimberg
An examination of the roles of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder on emotion regulation strategies of Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans Lauren M. Sippel · Alicia Roy · Steven M. Southwick · Harlan M. Fichtenholtz · Harlan M. Fichtenholtz
The influence of the menstrual cycle on reactivity to a CO2 challenge among women with and without premenstrual symptoms Yael I. Nillni · Suzanne L. Pineles · Kelly J. Rohan · Michael J. Zvolensky · Ann M. Rasmusson · Ann M. Rasmusson
Overcoming procrastination: one-year follow-up and predictors of change in a randomized controlled trial of Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy Alexander Rozental · Erik Forsell · Andreas Svensson · Gerhard Andersson · Per Carlbring · Per Carlbring
Examining the specific dimensions of distress tolerance that prospectively predict perceived stress Joseph R. Bardeen · Thomas A. Fergus · Holly K. Orcutt · Holly K. Orcutt
Rational emotive behaviour therapy in high schools to educate in mental health and empower youth health. A randomized controlled study of a brief intervention Gry Anette Sælid · Hans M. Nordahl · Hans M. Nordahl
Developing a cognitive behavioral therapy manual for delayed sleep–wake phase disorder Markus Jansson-Fröjmark · Katarina Danielsson · Agneta Markström · Jan-Erik Broman · Jan-Erik Broman
Cognitive risk factors explain the relations between neuroticism and social anxiety for males and females Nicholas P. Allan · Mary E. Oglesby · Aubree Uhl · Norman B. Schmidt · Norman B. Schmidt
Clicking away at co-rumination: co-rumination correlates across different modalities of communication Ani C. Keshishian · Melanie A. Watkins · Michael W. Otto · Michael W. Otto
Effect of regulating anger and sadness on decision-making Paul Lucian Szasz · Stefan G. Hofmann · Renata M. Heilman · Joshua Curtiss · Joshua Curtiss
Acculturative stress and experiential avoidance: relations to depression, suicide, and anxiety symptoms among minority college students Michael J. Zvolensky · Charles Jardin · Lorra Garey · Zuzuky Robles · Carla Sharp · Carla Sharp
Acceptability of a brief computerized intervention targeting anxiety sensitivity Nicole A. Short · Kelly Fuller · Aaron M. Norr · Norman B. Schmidt · Norman B. Schmidt
National attitudes towards mental health treatment: the importance of research evidence Alex Kirk · Joshua J. Broman-Fulks · John Bergquist · John Bergquist
Cardiorespiratory fitness moderates the effect of an affect-guided physical activity prescription: a pilot randomized controlled trial Austin S. Baldwin · Julie L. Kangas · Deanna C. Denman · Jasper A. J. Smits · Tetsuhiro Yamada · Michael W. Otto · Michael W. Otto
Clarifying the unique associations among intolerance of uncertainty, anxiety, and depression* Dane Jensen · Jonah N. Cohen · Douglas S. Mennin · David M. Fresco · Richard G. Heimberg · Richard G. Heimberg
No site unseen: predicting the failure to control problematic Internet use among young adults Tetsuhiro Yamada · Samantha J. Moshier · Michael W. Otto · Michael W. Otto

Insomnia and eating expectancies among college students: the role of emotion dysregulation
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy | 2018
Brooke Y. Kauffman · Jafar Bakhshaie · Hantin Lam · Candice A. Alfano · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky · Michael J. Zvolensky
Individually tailored internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults with anxiety and depression: a randomised controlled trial
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy | 2018
Kristin Silfvernagel · Anna Westlinder · Stina Andersson · Kajsa Bergman · Rosario Diaz Hernandez · Line Fallhagen · Ida Lundqvist · Nicole Masri · Linda Viberg · Marie-Louise Forsberg · Maria Lind · Thomas Berger · Per Carlbring · Gerhard Andersson · Gerhard Andersson
The effects of clinical supervision on supervisees and patients in cognitive behavioral therapy: a systematic review
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy | 2018
Sven Alfonsson · Thomas Parling · Åsa Spännargård · Gerhard Andersson · Tobias Lundgren · Tobias Lundgren
A longitudinal assessment of the road to mental readiness training among municipal police
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy | 2018
R. Nicholas Carleton · Stephanie Korol · Julia E. Mason · Kadie Hozempa · Gregory S. Anderson · Nicholas A. Jones · Keith S. Dobson · Andrew Szeto · Suzanne Bailey · Suzanne Bailey