Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Journal Impact IF - Analysis · Trend · Prediction · Ranking


New

Journal Impact IF

2019-2020

1.647

21.1%

Journal Impact IF Trend

Related Journals

Popular Journals

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry

The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.647, which is just updated in 2020.

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Impact Factor
Highest IF
1.705
Highest Journal Impact IF

The highest Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.705.

Lowest IF
1.025
Lowest Journal Impact IF

The lowest Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.025.

Total Growth Rate
42.2%
IF Total Growth Rate

The total growth rate of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry IF is 42.2%.

Annual Growth Rate
4.7%
IF Annual Growth Rate

The annual growth rate of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry IF is 4.7%.

Journal Impact IF Ranking

Subcategory Quartile Rank Percentile
Psychiatry and Mental Health Q2 211/506

Psychiatry and Mental Health 58%

Clinical Psychology Q2 90/275

Clinical Psychology 67%

Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health Q2 90/286

Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health 68%

Journal Impact IF Ranking

· In the Psychiatry and Mental Health research field, the Quartile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is Q2. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has been ranked #211 over 506 related journals in the Psychiatry and Mental Health research category. The ranking percentile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is around 58% in the field of Psychiatry and Mental Health.
· In the Clinical Psychology research field, the Quartile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is Q2. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has been ranked #90 over 275 related journals in the Clinical Psychology research category. The ranking percentile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is around 67% in the field of Clinical Psychology.
· In the Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health research field, the Quartile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is Q2. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has been ranked #90 over 286 related journals in the Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health research category. The ranking percentile of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is around 68% in the field of Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health.

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Impact Factor 2020-2021 Prediction

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Impact Factor Predition System

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Impact Factor Prediction System is now online. You can start share your valuable insights with the community.

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Total Publications
1414
Total Citations
26504

Annual Publication Volume

Annual Citation Record

International Collaboration Trend

Cited Documents Trend

Journal Impact IF History

Year Journal Impact IF
Year Journal Impact IF
2019-2020 1.647
2018-2019 1.36
2017-2018 1.705
2016-2017 1.145
2015-2016 1.192
2014-2015 1.025
2013-2014 1.578
2012-2013 1.457
2011-2012 1.158
Journal Impact IF History

· The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.647
· The 2018-2019 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.36
· The 2017-2018 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.705
· The 2016-2017 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.145
· The 2015-2016 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.192
· The 2014-2015 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.025
· The 2013-2014 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.578
· The 2012-2013 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.457
· The 2011-2012 Journal Impact IF of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1.158

Publications Cites Dataset

Year Publications Citations
Year Publications Citations
1970 1 0
1996 53 22
1997 45 50
1998 48 78
1999 46 115
2000 57 137
2001 49 187
2002 52 251
2003 41 374
2004 50 384
2005 60 533
2006 55 595
2007 80 714
2008 68 951
2009 74 1130
2010 64 1333
2011 46 1541
2012 49 1833
2013 46 1952
2014 46 2152
2015 51 2168
2016 52 1827
2017 49 1960
2018 43 1466
2019 69 1838
2020 119 2775
2021 1 138
Publications Cites Dataset

· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 1 reports and received 0 citations in 1970.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 53 reports and received 22 citations in 1996.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 45 reports and received 50 citations in 1997.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 48 reports and received 78 citations in 1998.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 46 reports and received 115 citations in 1999.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 57 reports and received 137 citations in 2000.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 49 reports and received 187 citations in 2001.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 52 reports and received 251 citations in 2002.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 41 reports and received 374 citations in 2003.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 50 reports and received 384 citations in 2004.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 60 reports and received 533 citations in 2005.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 55 reports and received 595 citations in 2006.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 80 reports and received 714 citations in 2007.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 68 reports and received 951 citations in 2008.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 74 reports and received 1130 citations in 2009.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 64 reports and received 1333 citations in 2010.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 46 reports and received 1541 citations in 2011.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 49 reports and received 1833 citations in 2012.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 46 reports and received 1952 citations in 2013.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 46 reports and received 2152 citations in 2014.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 51 reports and received 2168 citations in 2015.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 52 reports and received 1827 citations in 2016.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 49 reports and received 1960 citations in 2017.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 43 reports and received 1466 citations in 2018.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 69 reports and received 1838 citations in 2019.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 119 reports and received 2775 citations in 2020.
· The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry has published 1 reports and received 138 citations in 2021.
· The total publications of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1414.
· The total citations of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 26504.

What is Impact Factor?

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly average number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factor values are often deemed to be more important, or carry more intrinsic prestige in their respective fields, than those with lower values.

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry | Academic Accelerator - About the Impact Factor

Impact factor is commonly used to evaluate the relative importance of a journal within its field and to measure the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a particular time period. Journal which publishes more review articles will get highest IFs. Journals with higher IFs believed to be more important than those with lower ones. According to Eugene Garfield “impact simply reflects the ability of the journals and editors to attract the best paper available.” Journal which publishes more review articles will get maximum IFs. The Impact Factor of an academic journal is a scientometric Metric that reflects the yearly average number of citations that recent articles published in a given journal received. It is frequently used as a Metric for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher Impact Factor are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry Impact Factor IF measures the average number of citations received in a particular year (2020) by papers published in the Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry during the two preceding years (2018-2019). Note that 2020 Impact Factor are reported in 2021; they cannot be calculated until all of the 2020 publications have been processed by the indexing agency. New journals, which are indexed from their first published issue, will receive an impact factor after two years of indexing; in this case, the citations to the year prior to Volume 1, and the number of articles published in the year prior to Volume 1, are known zero values. Journals that are indexed starting with a volume other than the first volume will not get an impact factor until they have been indexed for three years. Occasionally, Journal Citation Reports assigns an impact factor to new journals with less than two years of indexing, based on partial citation data. The calculation always uses two complete and known years of item counts, but for new titles one of the known counts is zero. Annuals and other irregular publications sometimes publish no items in a particular year, affecting the count. The impact factor relates to a specific time period; it is possible to calculate it for any desired period. In addition to the 2-year Impact Factor, the 3-year Impact Factor, 4-year Impact Factor, 5-year Impact Factor, Real-Time Impact Factor can provide further insights and factors into the impact of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

History

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson ISI was sold to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate, which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Use

The impact factor is used to compare different journals within a certain field. The Web of Science indexes more than 11,500 science and social science journals. Journal impact factors are often used to evaluate the merit of individual articles and individual researchers. This use of impact factors was summarised by Hoeffel:

Impact Factor is not a perfect tool to measure the quality of articles but there is nothing better and it has the advantage of already being in existence and is, therefore, a good technique for scientific evaluation. Experience has shown that in each specialty the best journals are those in which it is most difficult to have an article accepted, and these are the journals that have a high impact factor. Most of these journals existed long before the impact factor was devised. The use of impact factor as a measure of quality is widespread because it fits well with the opinion we have in each field of the best journals in our specialty....In conclusion, prestigious journals publish papers of high level. Therefore, their impact factor is high, and not the contrary.

Eugene Garfield

In brief, Impact factors may be used by:
  • Authors to decide where to submit an article for publication.
  • Libraries to make collection development decisions
  • Academic departments to assess academic productivity
  • Academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
As impact factors are a journal-level metric, rather than an article- or individual-level metric, this use is controversial. Garfield agrees with Hoeffel,but warns about the "misuse in evaluating individuals" because there is "a wide variation [of citations] from article to article within a single journal". Other things to consider about Impact Factors:
  • Many journals do not have an impact factor.
  • The impact factor cannot assess the quality of individual articles. Even if citations were evenly distributed among articles, the impact factor would only measure the interests of other researchers in an article, not its importance and usefulness.
  • Only research articles, technical notes and reviews are “citable” items. Editorials, letters, news items and meeting abstracts are “non-citable items”.
  • Only a small percentage of articles are highly cited and they are found in a small subset of journals. This small proportion accounts for a large percentage of citations.
  • Controversial papers, such as those based on fraudulent data, may be highly cited, distorting the impact factor of a journal.
  • Citation bias may exist. For example, English language resources may be favoured. Authors may cite their own work.
Moreover, informed and careful use of these impact data is essential, and should be based on a thorough understanding of the methodology used to generate impact factors. There are controversial aspects of using impact factors:
  • It is not clear whether the number of times a paper is cited measures its actual quality.
  • Some databases that calculate impact factors fail to incorporate publications including textbooks, handbooks and reference books.
  • Certain disciplines have low numbers of journals and usage. Therefore, one should only compare journals or researchers within the same discipline.
  • Review articles normally are cited more often and therefore can skew results.
  • Self-citing may also skew results.
  • Some resources used to calculate impact factors have inadequate international coverage.
  • Editorial policies can artificially inflate an impact factor.
Impact factors have often been used in advancement and tenure decision-making. Many recognize that this is a coarse tool for such important decisions, and that a multitude of factors should be taken into account in these deliberations. When considering the use of the impact factor (IF), keep these aspects in mind:
  • IF analysis is limited to citations from the journals indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge. Currently, the Web of Science indexes only 8621 journals across the full breadth of the sciences, and just 3121 in the social sciences.
  • A high IF/citation rate says nothing about the quality -- or even, validity -- of the references being cited. Notorious or even retracted articles often attract a lot of attention, hence a high number of citations. The notority related to the first publication on "cold fusion" is one such example.
  • Journals that publish more "review articles" are often found near the top of the rankings. While not known for publishing new, creative findings, these individual articles tend to be heavily cited.
  • The IF measures the average number of citations to articles in the journal -- given this, a small number of highly-cited articles will skew the figure.
  • It takes several years for new journals to be added to the list of titles indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge, so these newer titles will be under-represented.
  • It's alleged that journal editors have learned to "game" the system, encouraging authors to cite their works previously published in the same journal.
Comparing Journals Across Disciplines? Not a good idea! Using Impact Factors within a given discipline should only be done with great care, as described above. Using impact factor data to compare journals across disciplines is even more problematic. Here are some of the reasons:
  • Disciplines where older literature is still referenced, such as Chemistry and Mathematics, offer challenges to the methodolgy since older citations (older than two years) are not used to calculate the impact factor for a given journal. (Five-year impact factor analysis, which can be calculated using the Journal Citation Index database, helps smooth out this problem only to some degree.)
  • Different disciplines have different practices regarding tendency to cite larger numbers of references. Higher overall citation rates will bump upward impact factor measurements.
  • Where it's common for large numbers of authors to collaborate on a single paper, such as in Physics, the tendency of authors to cite themselves (and in this case, more authors) will result in increased citation rates.

Pros and Cons of the Impact Factor

Pros:

  • A vetted, established metric for measuring journal impact within a discipline.
  • Designed to eliminate bias based on journal size and frequency.
Cons:
  • Individual articles makes an uneven contribution to overall Impact Factor.
  • Impact Factor does not account for certain things, things like context (postive or negative citaion) and intentionality (self-citation).
  • The metric is proprietary to and bound by the contents of the Thomson Reuters database.
  • Citations, on which the Impact Factor is based, count for less than 1% of an article's overall use.

Criticism

Numerous critiques have been made regarding the use of impact factors. A 2007 study noted that the most fundamental flaw is that impact factors present the mean of data that are not normally distributed, and suggested that it would be more appropriate to present the median of these data. There is also a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers). Other criticism focuses on the effect of the impact factor on behavior of scholars, editors and other stakeholders. Others have made more general criticisms, arguing that emphasis on impact factor results from negative influence of neoliberal policies on academia claiming that what is needed is not just replacement of the impact factor with more sophisticated metrics for science publications but also discussion on the social value of research assessment and the growing precariousness of scientific careers in higher education.
Experts stress that there are limitations in using impact factors to evaluate a scholar's work. There are many reasons cited for not relying on impact factor alone to evaluate the output of a particular individual. Among these are the following:

  • A single factor is not sufficient for evaluating an author's work.
  • Journal values are meaningless unless compared within the same discipline. Impact factors vary among disciplines.
  • The impact factor was originally devised to show the impact of a specific journal, not a specific scholar. The quality and impact of the author's work may extend beyond the impact of a particular journal.
According to Jim Testa, a researcher for ThomsonReuters Scientific, the most widespread misuse of the Impact Factor is to evaluate the work of an individual author (instead of a journal). "To say that because a researcher is publishing in a certain journal, he or she is more influential or deserves more credit is not necessarily true. There are many other variables to consider." (interview 6/26/2008 in Thomson Reuters blog entry)

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Journal Profile

About

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry brings together clinically oriented, peer reviewed work of the highest distinction from an international and multidisciplinary perspective, offering comprehensive coverage of clinical and treatment issues across the range of treatment modalities.Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is interested in advancing theory, practice and clinical research in the realm of child and adolescent psychology and psychiatry and related disciplines.The journal directs its attention to matters of clinical practice, including related topics such as the ethics of treatment and the integration of research into practice.Multidisciplinary in approach, the journal includes work by, and is of interest to, child psychologists, psychiatrists and psychotherapists, nurses, social workers and all other professionals in the fields of child and adolescent psychology and psychiatry. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal that covers the field of child psychology and psychiatry. The editors-in-chief are Anna Brazier (University Hospital of Wales) and Michael Tarren-Sweeney (University of Canterbury). It was established in 1996 and is currently published by SAGE Publications.

Highly Cited Keywords

ISSN
1359-1045
ISSN

The ISSN of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is 1359-1045 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

ISSN (Online)
-
ISSN (Online)

The ISSN (Online) of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is - . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

Publisher
SAGE Publications Ltd
Publisher

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is published by SAGE Publications Ltd .

Publication Frequency
Quarterly
Publication Frequency

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry publishes reports Quarterly .

Coverage
1996 - Present
Coverage

The Publication History of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry covers 1996 - Present .

Open Access
NO
Open Access

Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publishers.

Publication Fee
Publication Fee

There is no publication fee for submiting manuscript to Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles.

Language
English
Language

The language of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is English .

Country/Region
United States
Country/Region

The publisher of Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry is SAGE Publications Ltd , which locates in United States .

Selected Articles

Full Title Authors
Full Title Authors
Adoptive parents experiences of dyadic developmental psychotherapy Megan Wingfield · Ben Gurney-Smith · Ben Gurney-Smith
Looking into the future: The potential impact of emerging trends on child and family mental health services: Nicholas Long · Nicholas Long
A review of adolescent autobiographical memory and the implications for assessment of unaccompanied minors refugee determinations: Zoe Given-Wilson · Matthew Hodes · Jane Herlihy · Jane Herlihy
Ghosts, tigers and landmines in the nursery: Attachment narratives of loss in Tamil refugee children with dead or missing fathers: Lux Ratnamohan · Lux Ratnamohan · Sarah Mares · Derrick Silove · Derrick Silove · Derrick Silove
Collective narrative practice with unaccompanied refugee minors:The Tree of Lifeas a response to hardship Suzan Fm Jacobs · Suzan Fm Jacobs
Parent–youth informant disagreement: Implications for youth anxiety treatment Emily M. Becker-Haimes · Emily M. Becker-Haimes · Amanda Jensen-Doss · Boris Birmaher · Philip C. Kendall · Golda S. Ginsburg · Golda S. Ginsburg
The impact of fathers military deployment on child adjustment. The support needs of primary school children and their families separated during active military service: A pilot study Sharon Pexton · Jacqui Farrants · William Yule · William Yule
The psychosocial needs of refugee children and youth and best practices for filling these needs: A systematic review: Cisse Nakeyar · Victoria M. Esses · Graham J. Reid · Graham J. Reid
When one childhood meets another – maternal childhood trauma and offspring child psychopathology: A systematic review: D.T. Plant · D.T. Plant · Susan Pawlby · Carmine M. Pariante · F. W. Jones · F. W. Jones
The impact of deployment and traumatic brain injury on the health and behavior of children of US military service members and veterans Tracey A. Brickell · Tracey A. Brickell · S Lippa · Rael T. Lange · Rael T. Lange · Rael T. Lange
Outcomes of inpatient psychiatric treatment for adolescents: A multiple perspectives evaluation: YingMin Lee · Peter Martin · Pippa Hembry · Simon L. Lewis · Simon L. Lewis
Fathers experiences of their childs life-limiting condition: An attachment narrative perspective: Oliver Bailey-Pearce · Jacqui Stedmon · Rudi Dallos · George Davis · George Davis
Differences in illness perception between children with cancer and other chronic diseases and their parents Annamária Szentes · Gyöngyi Kökönyei · Gyöngyi Kökönyei · Andrea Békési · Andrea Békési · Ildikó Bokrétás · Szabolcs Török · Szabolcs Török
Family Coaching as a delivery modality for evidence-based prevention programs Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus · Dallas Swendeman · Erin Rotheram-Fuller · Maryann Youssef · Maryann Youssef
Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in children and adolescents: Part I – Diagnostic formulations: Kasia Kozlowska · Catherine Chudleigh · Catherine Cruz · Melissa Lim · Georgia McClure · Blanche Savage · Ubaid Shah · Averil Cook · Stephen Scher · Pascal Carrive · Deepak Gill · Deepak Gill
Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in children and adolescents: Part II – explanations to families, treatment, and group outcomes Kasia Kozlowska · Catherine Chudleigh · Catherine Cruz · Melissa Lim · Georgia McClure · Blanche Savage · Ubaid Shah · Averil Cook · Stephen Scher · Pascal Carrive · Deepak Gill · Deepak Gill
It feels like something difficult is coming back to haunt me: An exploration of meltdowns associated with autistic spectrum disorder from a parental perspective Indiana Montaque · Rudi Dallos · Becky McKenzie · Becky McKenzie
The effectiveness of psychological interventions with adoptive parents on adopted children and adolescents outcomes: A systematic review: Sorcha Ní Chobhthaigh · Fiona Duffy · Fiona Duffy
Parents experiences of their adolescents mental health treatment: Helplessness or agency-based hope Jenny Brown · Jenny Brown
Adopted childrens co-production and use of trove (a digitally enhanced memory box) to better understand their care histories through precious objects: Debbie L Watson · Chloe Meineck · Beth Lancaster · Beth Lancaster
Secondary trauma and compassion fatigue in foster carers Beatrice Hannah · Matthew Woolgar · Matthew Woolgar · Matthew Woolgar
Does continuing family-based treatment for adolescent anorexia nervosa improve outcomes in those not remitted after 20 sessions? Andrew Wallis · Andrew Wallis · Jane Miskovic-Wheatley · Sloane Madden · Colleen Alford · Paul Rhodes · Stephen Touyz · Stephen Touyz
Mindfulness-based group therapy: Impact on psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents Deanna P. Sams · Elizabeth D. Handley · Linda J. Alpert-Gillis · Linda J. Alpert-Gillis
Intentional music use to reduce psychological distress in adolescents accessing primary mental health care Katrina McFerran · Cherry Hense · Asami Koike · Debra Rickwood · Debra Rickwood · Debra Rickwood
Psychosocial screening and monitoring for children in foster care: Psychometric properties of the Brief Assessment Checklist in a Dutch population study: Anouk Goemans · Michael Tarren-Sweeney · Mitch van Geel · Paul Vedder · Paul Vedder
The presence of co-morbid mental health problems in a cohort of adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome Maria Loades · Maria Loades · Katharine A. Rimes · Sheila Ali · Kate Lievesley · Trudie Chalder · Trudie Chalder · Trudie Chalder
Is social media bad for mental health and wellbeing? Exploring the perspectives of adolescents: Michelle O’Reilly · Nisha Dogra · Natasha Whiteman · Jason Hughes · Seyda Eruyar · Paul Reilly · Paul Reilly
Assessing speech, language and communication difficulties in children referred for ADHD: A qualitative evaluation of a UK child and adolescent mental health service: Kelly My Chan · Andrew J. B. Fugard · Andrew J. B. Fugard · Andrew J. B. Fugard
Stories of trauma in family therapy with refugees: Supporting safe relational spaces of narration and silence: Lucia De Haene · Cécile Rousseau · Ruth Kevers · Nele Deruddere · Peter Rober · Peter Rober
Childhood maltreatment and its link to borderline personality disorder features in children: A systematic review approach Jeyda Ibrahim · Nicola Cosgrave · Matthew Woolgar · Matthew Woolgar
Sleep and psychiatric symptoms in young child psychiatric outpatients Hanna Huhdanpää · Liisa Klenberg · Hannu Westerinen · Tuija Fontell · Eeva T. Aronen · Eeva T. Aronen
The Home Observation Measure of the Environment is associated with symptoms of ADHD and oppositionality in a CAMHS sample Wai Wai Lai · Michelle O’Mahony · Aisling Mulligan · Aisling Mulligan
Understanding the experiences of middle school girls who have received help for non-suicidal self-injury: Kathleen S. Tillman · Michael Prazak · Megan L. Obert · Megan L. Obert
Positive Thinking Elevates Tolerance: Experimental Effects of Happiness on Adolescents Attitudes Towards Asylum Seekers Harriet R. Tenenbaum · Tereza Capelos · Jessica Lorimer · Thomas Stocks · Thomas Stocks
Seeing the child in context: Supporting gender diverse children and their families in multiple ways – An introduction to this special edition Trilby Langton · Bernadette Wren · Polly Carmichael · Polly Carmichael
Understanding resilience in young people with complex mental health needs: A Delphi study: Ellysia-Grace Thompson · Susan Knowles · Pete Greasley · Pete Greasley
A qualitative exploration of the experiences of adoptive parents attending Nurturing Attachments, a dyadic developmental psychotherapy informed group: Olivia Hewitt · Ben Gurney-Smith · Kim Golding · Kim Golding
Which parents dropout from an evidence-based parenting programme (Triple-P) at CAMHS? Comparison of programme-completing and dropout parents Aylin Özbek · Özlem Gencer · Aybüke Tugçe Mustan · Aybüke Tugçe Mustan
Change in mental health symptoms in families with nonresponding children referred to inpatient family units Tormod Rimehaug · Tormod Rimehaug
Childrens experiences of being diagnosed with cancer at the early stages of treatment; an interpretive phenomenological analysis Jill Mant · Angela Kirby · Kathy J Cox · Amos Burke · Amos Burke
Empowering young people who experienced domestic violence and abuse: the development of a group therapy intervention (Forthcoming/Available Online) Lisa Fellin · Jane Callaghan · Joanne H Alexander · Claire Harrison-Breed · Stavroula Mavrou · Maria Papathanassiou · Maria Papathanassiou
Soapbox: Technical, relational and relational-collaborative approaches to risk management Percy Aggett · Philip Messent · Philip Messent
A therapeutic group for young people with diverse gender identifications Sarah Davidson · Annabelle Morrison · Elin Skagerberg · Ian Russell · Anna Hames · Anna Hames
Gender Dysphoria in looked-after and adopted young people in a gender identity development service: Tom Matthews · Victoria Holt · Senem Sahin · Amelia Taylor · David Griksaitis · David Griksaitis
Validation of the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument with a looked after population Claire Reilly · Dan R Johnson · Kirstin Ferguson · Kirstin Ferguson
Taking the stone from my heart: An exploration of the benefits of a mentoring programme (PROMISE) for children at risk of significant harm Rudi Dallos · Hassina Carder-Gilbert · Hassina Carder-Gilbert
Gender diversity and non-binary presentations in young people attending the United Kingdoms National Gender Identity Development Service Jos Twist · Nastasja M de Graaf · Nastasja M de Graaf
Cognitive, emotional, and behavioral profile in children and adolescents with chronic pain associated with rheumatic diseases: A case-control study: Maria Pascali · Emilia Matera · Francesco Craig · Francesco La Torre · Paola Giordano · Francesco Margari · Giuseppina Zagaria · Mariella Margari · Lucia Margari · Lucia Margari
Stratified medicine and child psychology and psychiatry: An old or new paradigm? Eilis Kennedy · Eilis Kennedy
Capturing the impact of adolescent inpatient admissions: The Social Connectedness Scale Katy Phillips · Bridie Lawler Whatson · Emma Wells · Gordon Milson · Samantha Hartley · Samantha Hartley
Use of respiratory rates and heart rate variability in the assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with functional somatic symptoms Catherine Chudleigh · Blanche Savage · Catherine Cruz · Melissa Lim · Georgia McClure · Donna M. Palmer · Chris Spooner · Kasia Kozlowska · Kasia Kozlowska · Kasia Kozlowska
It is that bad but it isnt that bad: Exploring childrens experiences of their mothers non-terminal cancer with a focus on attachment, resilience and trauma Laura Tozer · Jacqui Stedmon · Rudi Dallos · Rudi Dallos
Adolescent development in family-based treatment for anorexia nervosa: Patients and parents narratives Meredith Medway · Paul Rhodes · Lisa Dawson · Jane Miskovic-Wheatley · Andrew Wallis · Sloane Madden · Sloane Madden
Home-based family-focused rehabilitation for adolescents with severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Mary Burgess · Kate Lievesley · Sheila Ali · Trudie Chalder · Trudie Chalder
Editorial by Paul Tibbles in dialogue with Ncazelo Ncube Paul Tibbles · Paul Tibbles
Parental reactions to parent- and sibling-directed aggression within a domestic violence context Michelle P. Desir · Canan Karatekin · Canan Karatekin
Understanding experiences of the self-harm of others : A qualitative exploration of the views of young people with complex mental health needs Claire Smith-Gowling · Sue Knowles · Suzanne Hodge · Suzanne Hodge
Healing stories: An expressive-narrative intervention for strengthening resilience and survival skills in school-aged child victims of war and political violence in the Gaza Strip Guido Veronese · Gianpiero Barola · Gianpiero Barola
Risk factors influencing severity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in a sample of preparatory school students in Cairo Hisham Ramy · Mona M. El Sheikh · Marwa Sultan · Rasha E. Bassim · Maissa Eid · Ramy Ali · Marwa El Missiry · Marwa El Missiry
Conners 3–Self-Report Scale: An empirical support to the dimensionality of the content scales Viola Angela Izzo · Maria Anna Donati · Caterina Primi · Caterina Primi
Mental health of unaccompanied asylum-seeking adolescents previously held in British detention centres: Kimberly A. Ehntholt · David Trickey · Jean Harris Hendriks · Hannah Chambers · Mark Scott · William Yule · William Yule
Challenges and impossibilities of standing alongside in an intolerable context: Learning from refugees and volunteers in the Calais camp: Charlotte Burck · Gillian Hughes · Gillian Hughes
Ambiguous loss and incomplete abduction narratives in Kosovo Laura Kajtazi-Testa · Christopher J. Hewer · Christopher J. Hewer
Impairments of executive function in young children referred to child psychiatric outpatient clinic Hanna Huhdanpää · Liisa Klenberg · Hannu Westerinen · Paula Bergman · Eeva T. Aronen · Eeva T. Aronen
Formulating autism systemically: Part 1 – A review of the published literature and case assessments Patricia M. Crittenden · Patricia M. Crittenden
Fix my child: The importance of including siblings in clinical assessments Steve Farnfield · Steve Farnfield
Gifts from Mary Ainsworth and John Bowlby Patricia M. Crittenden · Patricia M. Crittenden
Mental health services for our most vulnerable children Michael Tarren-Sweeney · Michael Tarren-Sweeney
The secret lives of children Patricia M. Crittenden · Patricia M. Crittenden
Formulating autism systemically: Part 2 – A 12-year prospective case study: Nicky Brewerton · Katrina Robson · Patricia M. Crittenden · Patricia M. Crittenden
Resolution of alliance ruptures: The special case of animal-assisted psychotherapy Sigal Zilcha-Mano · Sigal Zilcha-Mano
When things get complicated: At-risk attachment in children and adolescents with chronic pain: Lux Ratnamohan · Kasia Kozlowska · Kasia Kozlowska
Infant disorganized attachment: Clarifying levels of analysis Judith Solomon · Judith Solomon
Book review: Vetere, A. & Stratton, P. (Eds.). (2016) Interacting selves: Systemic solutions for personal and professional development in counselling and psychotherapyVetereA.StrattonP. (Eds.). (2016) Interacting selves: Systemic solutions for personal and professional development in counselling and psychotherapy. New York, NY: Routledge, 142 pp.; ISBN No. 9780415730853 (pb); ISBN No. 9780415730846 (hb) Mick Rusling · Mick Rusling
Animal-assisted dyadic therapy: A therapy model promoting development of the reflective function in the parent–child bond: Liat Shani · Liat Shani
Animal-assisted psychotherapy: A unique relational therapy for children and adolescents Keren Bachi · Nancy Parish-Plass · Nancy Parish-Plass · Nancy Parish-Plass
Simulation modeling analysis of sequential relations among therapeutic alliance, symptoms, and adherence to child-centered play therapy between a child with autism spectrum disorder and two therapists Geoff Goodman · Hyewon Chung · Leah Fischel · Laura Athey-Lloyd · Laura Athey-Lloyd
Its personal to me: A qualitative study of depression in young people with CFS/ME: Anna Taylor · Maria Loades · Amberly L C Brigden · Simon M Collin · Esther Crawley · Esther Crawley
Residential staff responses to adolescent self-harm: The helpful and unhelpful: Dan R Johnson · Kirstin Ferguson · Jennifer Copley · Jennifer Copley
Observed callousness as a predictor of treatment outcomes in parent management training Gunnar Bjørnebekk · John Kjøbli · John Kjøbli
Social Communication Anxiety Treatment (S-CAT) for children and families with selective mutism: A pilot study Evelyn R. Klein · Sharon Lee Armstrong · Kathryn Skira · Janice Gordon · Janice Gordon
The Meaning of the Child Interview: A new procedure for assessing and understanding parent–child relationships of at-risk families Ben Grey · Steve Farnfield · Steve Farnfield
The assessment of developmental trauma in children and adolescents: a systematic review Ruth Denton · Catherine Frogley · Sue Jackson · Sue Jackson · Mary John · Dawn Querstret · Dawn Querstret
Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy for adolescents experiencing depression and/or anxiety: A therapists perspective Kaitlyn Wilson · Melissa Buultjens · Melissa Monfries · Leila Karimi · Leila Karimi
Measuring what matters to patients: Using goal content to inform measure choice and development Jenna Jacob · Julian Edbrooke-Childs · Duncan Law · Miranda Wolpert · Miranda Wolpert
A qualitative exploration of attitudes towards the use of outcome measures in child and adolescent mental health services Evelyn Sharples · Chuan Qin · Vinita Goveas · Dawid Gondek · Jessica Deighton · Miranda Wolpert · Julian Edbrooke-Childs · Julian Edbrooke-Childs
Interviews with children about their mental health problems: The congruence and validity of information that children report Emily Macleod · June Woolford · Linda Hobbs · Julien Gross · Harlene Hayne · Tess Patterson · Tess Patterson
Young voices in mental health care: Exploring childrens and adolescents service experiences and preferences Stefan Persson · Curt Hagquist · Daniel Michelson · Daniel Michelson · Daniel Michelson
The use of cognitive remediation therapy on a child adolescent eating disorder unit: Patients and therapist perspectives Lucia Giombini · Robert Turton · Matteo Turco · Sophie Nesbitt · Bryan Lask · Bryan Lask
Punch injury self-harm in young people Cristal Oxley · Jane Roberts · Sebastian Kraemer · Giles Armstrong · Giles Armstrong
Child attachment and sensory regulation in psychiatric clinic-referred preschoolers: Aliya Mubarak · Chantal Cyr · Martin St-André · Daniel Paquette · Mutsuko Émond-Nakamura · Louise Boisjoly · Sylvain Palardy · Stéphanie Adin · Irena Stikarovska · Irena Stikarovska
Diagnosing disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: Integrating semi-structured and unstructured interviews Emily A. McTate · Jarrod M. Leffler · Jarrod M. Leffler
A critical analysis of Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services policy in England Jane Callaghan · Lisa Fellin · Fiona Warner-Gale · Fiona Warner-Gale
A qualitative investigation of eating difficulties in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis Sarah Harris · Matthew Gilbert · Lucy Beasant · Catherine Linney · Jessica Broughton · Esther Crawley · Esther Crawley
Reflections on assessment, diagnosis and formulation: Rudi Dallos · Rudi Dallos
Convergence between observations and interviews in clinical diagnosis of reactive attachment disorder and disinhibited social engagement disorder H.P. Giltaij · P.S. Sterkenburg · C. Schuengel · C. Schuengel
Autism and reactive attachment/disinhibited social engagement disorders: Co-occurrence and differentiation: Susan Dickerson Mayes · Susan L. Calhoun · Daniel A. Waschbusch · Raman Baweja · Raman Baweja
Disorders of sex development: Mothers experiences of support Clare Chivers · Jan Burns · Martha Deiros Collado · Martha Deiros Collado
Feasibility and efficacy of an attachment-based intervention in a maltreatment sample in residential care: A pilot study Marta Casonato · Sarah Nazzari · Alessandra Frigerio · Alessandra Frigerio
Toward an architecture of attachment disorganization: John Bowlbys published and unpublished reflections Judith Solomon · Judith Solomon · Robbie Duschinsky · Lianne Bakkum · C. Schuengel · C. Schuengel
Associations between family and clinician ratings of child mental health: A study of UK CAMHS assessments and outcomes: Dion N Terrelonge · Andrew J. B. Fugard · Andrew J. B. Fugard
Assessing attachment in school-aged children: Do the School-Age Assessment of Attachment and Family Drawings work together as complementary tools? Rebecca Carr-Hopkins · Calem De Burca · Felicity A Aldridge · Felicity A Aldridge
Interpersonal rejection sensitivity mediates the associations between peer victimization and two high-risk outcomes Caitlin Williams · James Doorley · Christianne Esposito-Smythers · Christianne Esposito-Smythers
Mother–child interactions in young children with excessive physical aggression and in typically developing young children Nadine Urbain-Gauthier · Jaqueline Wendland · Jaqueline Wendland
Autism and attachment difficulties: overlap of symptoms, implications and innovative solutions Rebecca McKenzie · Rudi Dallos · Rudi Dallos
How does video interaction guidance contribute to infant and parental mental health and well-being? Hilary Kennedy · Kevin Ball · Jane Barlow · Jane Barlow
Adapting and developing a video-feedback intervention for co-parents of infants at risk of externalising behaviour problems (VIPP-Co): A feasibility study Jane Iles · Camilla Rosan · Esther L. Wilkinson · Paul Ramchandani · Paul Ramchandani
Are mothers protective attachment strategies related to their childrens strategies?: Patricia M. Crittenden · Katrina Robson · Alison Tooby · Charles Fleming · Charles Fleming
Young childrens experiences of participating in group treatment for children exposed to intimate partner violence: A qualitative study Karin Pernebo · Kjerstin Almqvist · Kjerstin Almqvist
Children after adoption: Exploring their psychological needs Margaret DeJong · Jill Hodges · Osman Malik · Osman Malik
A psychoanalytic child psychotherapy contribution to generic assessments Peta Mees · Peta Mees
A qualitative analysis of implementing shared decision making in Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services in the United Kingdom: stages and facilitators Neus Abrines-Jaume · Neus Abrines-Jaume · Nick Midgley · Katy Hopkins · Jasmine Hoffman · Kate Martin · Duncan Law · Miranda Wolpert · Miranda Wolpert
Understanding the concept of resilience in relation to looked after children: A Delphi survey of perceptions from education, social care and foster care: Rebecca South · F. W. Jones · Elaine Creith · Laura M. Simonds · Laura M. Simonds
Examining experiences of transition, instability and coping for young offenders in the community: A qualitative analysis Rebecca A Heath · Helena Priest · Helena Priest · Helena Priest
Psychological wellbeing and quality-of-life among siblings of paediatric CFS/ME patients: A mixed-methods study Sophie Velleman · Simon M Collin · Lucy Beasant · Esther Crawley · Esther Crawley
Young people with features of gender dysphoria: Demographics and associated difficulties Vicky Holt · Elin Skagerberg · Michael Dunsford · Michael Dunsford
Adverse effects of psychological therapy: An exploratory study of practitioners experiences from child and adolescent psychiatry Ulf Jonsson · Ulf Jonsson · Josefin Johanson · Elin Nilsson · Elin Nilsson · Frank Lindblad · Frank Lindblad
Clinical competencies for the effective treatment of foster children Karen Zilberstein · Sally Popper · Sally Popper
Psychodynamic psychotherapy with adolescents and young adults: Outcome in routine practice Julia Nemirovski Edlund · Gunnar Carlberg · Gunnar Carlberg
A critical review of adolescent mindfulness-based programmes Lucy Tan · Lucy Tan
Uncovering a clinical portrait of sluggish cognitive tempo within an evaluation for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A case study Stephen P. Becker · Heather A. Ciesielski · Jennifer E. Rood · Tanya E. Froehlich · Annie A. Garner · Leanne Tamm · Jeffery N. Epstein · Jeffery N. Epstein
Why are you here?Seeking childrens accounts of their presentation to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) Victoria Stafford · Ian Hutchby · Khalid Karim · Michelle O’Reilly · Michelle O’Reilly
The effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for children with a psychiatric disorder and mild intellectual disability to borderline intellectual functioning: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis Lidwien Kok · Anne van der Waa · Helen Klip · Wouter G. Staal · Wouter G. Staal
The transition into adoptive parenthood: Adoption as a process of continued unsafe uncertainty when family scripts collide Fiona Tasker · Sally Wood · Sally Wood
Am I damaging my own family?: Relational changes between foster carers and their birth children Hayley Thompson · Susan McPherson · Louise Marsland · Louise Marsland
An evaluation of the Parents Plus – Parenting When Separated programme Adele Keating · John Sharry · Michelle Murphy · Brendan Rooney · Alan Carr · Alan Carr
Bangladeshi parental ethnotheories in the United Kingdom: Towards cultural collaborations in clinical practice Ruma Bose · Ruma Bose
Enriching practice of dialectic behaviour therapy with the dynamic maturational model of attachment and adaptation Simon R. Wilkinson · Simon R. Wilkinson
An evaluation of Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy: An integrative therapeutic approach to working with adopted children who have experienced early life trauma Elaine McCullough · Susi Gordon-Jones · Jay Vaughan · Alan Burnell · Alan Burnell
The relationship between child- and parent-reported shared decision making and child-, parent-, and clinician-reported treatment outcome in routinely collected child mental health services data Julian Edbrooke-Childs · Jenna Jacob · Rachel Argent · Praveetha Patalay · Jessica Deighton · Miranda Wolpert · Miranda Wolpert
She was a foster mother who said she didnt give cuddles: The adverse early foster care experiences of children who later struggle with adoptive family life Sarah Meakings · Julie Selwyn · Julie Selwyn
Horses for courses? A qualitative exploration of goals formulated in mental health settings by young people, parents, and clinicians Jenna Jacob · Julian Edbrooke-Childs · Simone Holley · Duncan Law · Miranda Wolpert · Miranda Wolpert
Beyond awareness of difference and towards social action: Solidarity practice alongside young people: Taiwo Afuape · Taiwo Afuape
The body comes to family therapy: Treatment of a school-aged boy with hyperventilation-induced non-epileptic seizures: Kasia Kozlowska · Kasia Kozlowska · Kasia Kozlowska · Catherine Chudleigh · Bronwen Elliott · Andrea Landini · Andrea Landini
The developmental case for adopting children from care Michael Tarren-Sweeney · Michael Tarren-Sweeney
Tribute to Prof David Lloyd Quinton, 8 February 1939–7 June 2016 Alan Rushton · Alan Rushton
Why who we are makes a difference Philip Messent · Reenee Singh · Reenee Singh
Clinical improvements in adopted children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders through neurodevelopmentally informed clinical intervention: A pilot study Zohreh Zarnegar · Erin P. Hambrick · Bruce D. Perry · Stanley P. Azen · Cassandra Peterson · Cassandra Peterson
Neuro-Physiological Psychotherapy (NPP): the development and application of an integrative, wrap-around service and treatment programme for maltreated children placed in adoptive and foster care placements Jay Vaughan · Elaine McCullough · Alan Burnell · Alan Burnell
Supporting young people living with cancer to tell their stories in ways that make them stronger: The Beads of Life approach: Sara Portnoy · Isabella Girling · Glenda Fredman · Glenda Fredman
We are dealing with it the best we can: Exploring parents attributions regarding their childs physical disability using the Four Ws framework Melissa Zschorn · Rosalyn Shute · Rosalyn Shute · Rosalyn Shute
Ties of silence - Family lived experience of selective mutism in identical twins: Vårin Albrigtsen · Benedicte Eskeland · Magne Mæhle · Magne Mæhle
The right location? Experiences of refugee adolescents seen by school-based mental health services Mina Fazel · Jo Garcia · Alan Stein · Alan Stein
From referral to discharge: Young people and parents experience of a systemic paediatric psychology service Isabella Girling · Susie Colville · Mimi Borrelli · Nicola Bowman · Deborah Christie · Deborah Christie
Soapbox: class matters in parenting interventions Karen Zilberstein · Karen Zilberstein
Parents difficulties as co-therapists in CBT among non-responding youths with anxiety disorders: Parent and therapist experiences Irene Lundkvist-Houndoumadi · Mikael Thastum · Klaus Nielsen · Klaus Nielsen
Book review: Social work with children and families: Getting into practice Maria Joy · Maria Joy
Book review: The handbook of mindfulness: Theory, research, and practice Christina Feldman · Christina Feldman
Becoming Invisible: The Effect of Triangulation on Childrens Well-Being Rudi Dallos · Katarzyna Lakus · Marie-Stephanie Cahart · Rebecca McKenzie · Rebecca McKenzie
Associations between evidence-based practice and mental health outcomes in child and adolescent mental health services: Jessica Deighton · Rachel Argent · Davide De Francesco · Julian Edbrooke-Childs · Jenna Jacob · Isobel Fleming · Tamsin Ford · Miranda Wolpert · Miranda Wolpert
Caregivers voices: The experiences of caregivers of children who sustained serious accidental and non-accidental head injury in early childhood: Julie Wharewera-Mika · Erana Cooper · Bridget Kool · Susana Pereira · Patrick Kelly · Patrick Kelly · Patrick Kelly