Child Development Perspectives
Journal Impact IF - Analysis · Trend · Prediction · Ranking


New

Journal Impact IF

2019-2020

4.636

4.7%

Journal Impact IF Trend

Related Journals

Popular Journals

Child Development Perspectives

The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 4.636, which is just updated in 2020.

Child Development Perspectives Impact Factor
Highest IF
4.636
Highest Journal Impact IF

The highest Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 4.636.

Lowest IF
1.559
Lowest Journal Impact IF

The lowest Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 1.559.

Total Growth Rate
197.4%
IF Total Growth Rate

The total growth rate of Child Development Perspectives IF is 197.4%.

Annual Growth Rate
21.9%
IF Annual Growth Rate

The annual growth rate of Child Development Perspectives IF is 21.9%.

Journal Impact IF Ranking

Subcategory Quartile Rank Percentile
Life-span and Life-course Studies Q1 2/53

Life-span and Life-course Studies 97%

Developmental and Educational Psychology Q1 11/327

Developmental and Educational Psychology 96%

Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health Q1 7/286

Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health 97%

Journal Impact IF Ranking

· In the Life-span and Life-course Studies research field, the Quartile of Child Development Perspectives is Q1. Child Development Perspectives has been ranked #2 over 53 related journals in the Life-span and Life-course Studies research category. The ranking percentile of Child Development Perspectives is around 97% in the field of Life-span and Life-course Studies.
· In the Developmental and Educational Psychology research field, the Quartile of Child Development Perspectives is Q1. Child Development Perspectives has been ranked #11 over 327 related journals in the Developmental and Educational Psychology research category. The ranking percentile of Child Development Perspectives is around 96% in the field of Developmental and Educational Psychology.
· In the Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health research field, the Quartile of Child Development Perspectives is Q1. Child Development Perspectives has been ranked #7 over 286 related journals in the Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health research category. The ranking percentile of Child Development Perspectives is around 97% in the field of Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health.

Child Development Perspectives Impact Factor 2020-2021 Prediction

Child Development Perspectives Impact Factor Predition System

Child Development Perspectives Impact Factor Prediction System is now online. You can start share your valuable insights with the community.

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Total Publications
617
Total Citations
38965

Annual Publication Volume

Annual Citation Record

International Collaboration Trend

Cited Documents Trend

Journal Impact IF History

Year Journal Impact IF
Year Journal Impact IF
2019-2020 4.636
2018-2019 4.427
2017-2018 3.207
2016-2017 3.911
2015-2016 3.284
2014-2015 3.264
2013-2014 2.602
2012-2013 2.12
2011-2012 1.559
Journal Impact IF History

· The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 4.636
· The 2018-2019 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 4.427
· The 2017-2018 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 3.207
· The 2016-2017 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 3.911
· The 2015-2016 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 3.284
· The 2014-2015 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 3.264
· The 2013-2014 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 2.602
· The 2012-2013 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 2.12
· The 2011-2012 Journal Impact IF of Child Development Perspectives is 1.559

Publications Cites Dataset

Year Publications Citations
Year Publications Citations
2007 29 33
2008 33 73
2009 38 347
2010 37 589
2011 58 913
2012 67 1577
2013 45 2214
2014 42 2948
2015 47 3773
2016 45 4214
2017 44 4506
2018 44 4184
2019 42 5375
2020 42 7734
2021 4 485
Publications Cites Dataset

· The Child Development Perspectives has published 29 reports and received 33 citations in 2007.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 33 reports and received 73 citations in 2008.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 38 reports and received 347 citations in 2009.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 37 reports and received 589 citations in 2010.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 58 reports and received 913 citations in 2011.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 67 reports and received 1577 citations in 2012.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 45 reports and received 2214 citations in 2013.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 42 reports and received 2948 citations in 2014.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 47 reports and received 3773 citations in 2015.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 45 reports and received 4214 citations in 2016.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 44 reports and received 4506 citations in 2017.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 44 reports and received 4184 citations in 2018.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 42 reports and received 5375 citations in 2019.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 42 reports and received 7734 citations in 2020.
· The Child Development Perspectives has published 4 reports and received 485 citations in 2021.
· The total publications of Child Development Perspectives is 617.
· The total citations of Child Development Perspectives is 38965.

What is Impact Factor?

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly average number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factor values are often deemed to be more important, or carry more intrinsic prestige in their respective fields, than those with lower values.

Child Development Perspectives | Academic Accelerator - About the Impact Factor

Impact factor is commonly used to evaluate the relative importance of a journal within its field and to measure the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a particular time period. Journal which publishes more review articles will get highest IFs. Journals with higher IFs believed to be more important than those with lower ones. According to Eugene Garfield “impact simply reflects the ability of the journals and editors to attract the best paper available.” Journal which publishes more review articles will get maximum IFs. The Impact Factor of an academic journal is a scientometric Metric that reflects the yearly average number of citations that recent articles published in a given journal received. It is frequently used as a Metric for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher Impact Factor are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The Child Development Perspectives Impact Factor IF measures the average number of citations received in a particular year (2020) by papers published in the Child Development Perspectives during the two preceding years (2018-2019). Note that 2020 Impact Factor are reported in 2021; they cannot be calculated until all of the 2020 publications have been processed by the indexing agency. New journals, which are indexed from their first published issue, will receive an impact factor after two years of indexing; in this case, the citations to the year prior to Volume 1, and the number of articles published in the year prior to Volume 1, are known zero values. Journals that are indexed starting with a volume other than the first volume will not get an impact factor until they have been indexed for three years. Occasionally, Journal Citation Reports assigns an impact factor to new journals with less than two years of indexing, based on partial citation data. The calculation always uses two complete and known years of item counts, but for new titles one of the known counts is zero. Annuals and other irregular publications sometimes publish no items in a particular year, affecting the count. The impact factor relates to a specific time period; it is possible to calculate it for any desired period. In addition to the 2-year Impact Factor, the 3-year Impact Factor, 4-year Impact Factor, 5-year Impact Factor, Real-Time Impact Factor can provide further insights and factors into the impact of Child Development Perspectives.

History

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson ISI was sold to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate, which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Use

The impact factor is used to compare different journals within a certain field. The Web of Science indexes more than 11,500 science and social science journals. Journal impact factors are often used to evaluate the merit of individual articles and individual researchers. This use of impact factors was summarised by Hoeffel:

Impact Factor is not a perfect tool to measure the quality of articles but there is nothing better and it has the advantage of already being in existence and is, therefore, a good technique for scientific evaluation. Experience has shown that in each specialty the best journals are those in which it is most difficult to have an article accepted, and these are the journals that have a high impact factor. Most of these journals existed long before the impact factor was devised. The use of impact factor as a measure of quality is widespread because it fits well with the opinion we have in each field of the best journals in our specialty....In conclusion, prestigious journals publish papers of high level. Therefore, their impact factor is high, and not the contrary.

Eugene Garfield

In brief, Impact factors may be used by:
  • Authors to decide where to submit an article for publication.
  • Libraries to make collection development decisions
  • Academic departments to assess academic productivity
  • Academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
As impact factors are a journal-level metric, rather than an article- or individual-level metric, this use is controversial. Garfield agrees with Hoeffel,but warns about the "misuse in evaluating individuals" because there is "a wide variation [of citations] from article to article within a single journal". Other things to consider about Impact Factors:
  • Many journals do not have an impact factor.
  • The impact factor cannot assess the quality of individual articles. Even if citations were evenly distributed among articles, the impact factor would only measure the interests of other researchers in an article, not its importance and usefulness.
  • Only research articles, technical notes and reviews are “citable” items. Editorials, letters, news items and meeting abstracts are “non-citable items”.
  • Only a small percentage of articles are highly cited and they are found in a small subset of journals. This small proportion accounts for a large percentage of citations.
  • Controversial papers, such as those based on fraudulent data, may be highly cited, distorting the impact factor of a journal.
  • Citation bias may exist. For example, English language resources may be favoured. Authors may cite their own work.
Moreover, informed and careful use of these impact data is essential, and should be based on a thorough understanding of the methodology used to generate impact factors. There are controversial aspects of using impact factors:
  • It is not clear whether the number of times a paper is cited measures its actual quality.
  • Some databases that calculate impact factors fail to incorporate publications including textbooks, handbooks and reference books.
  • Certain disciplines have low numbers of journals and usage. Therefore, one should only compare journals or researchers within the same discipline.
  • Review articles normally are cited more often and therefore can skew results.
  • Self-citing may also skew results.
  • Some resources used to calculate impact factors have inadequate international coverage.
  • Editorial policies can artificially inflate an impact factor.
Impact factors have often been used in advancement and tenure decision-making. Many recognize that this is a coarse tool for such important decisions, and that a multitude of factors should be taken into account in these deliberations. When considering the use of the impact factor (IF), keep these aspects in mind:
  • IF analysis is limited to citations from the journals indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge. Currently, the Web of Science indexes only 8621 journals across the full breadth of the sciences, and just 3121 in the social sciences.
  • A high IF/citation rate says nothing about the quality -- or even, validity -- of the references being cited. Notorious or even retracted articles often attract a lot of attention, hence a high number of citations. The notority related to the first publication on "cold fusion" is one such example.
  • Journals that publish more "review articles" are often found near the top of the rankings. While not known for publishing new, creative findings, these individual articles tend to be heavily cited.
  • The IF measures the average number of citations to articles in the journal -- given this, a small number of highly-cited articles will skew the figure.
  • It takes several years for new journals to be added to the list of titles indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge, so these newer titles will be under-represented.
  • It's alleged that journal editors have learned to "game" the system, encouraging authors to cite their works previously published in the same journal.
Comparing Journals Across Disciplines? Not a good idea! Using Impact Factors within a given discipline should only be done with great care, as described above. Using impact factor data to compare journals across disciplines is even more problematic. Here are some of the reasons:
  • Disciplines where older literature is still referenced, such as Chemistry and Mathematics, offer challenges to the methodolgy since older citations (older than two years) are not used to calculate the impact factor for a given journal. (Five-year impact factor analysis, which can be calculated using the Journal Citation Index database, helps smooth out this problem only to some degree.)
  • Different disciplines have different practices regarding tendency to cite larger numbers of references. Higher overall citation rates will bump upward impact factor measurements.
  • Where it's common for large numbers of authors to collaborate on a single paper, such as in Physics, the tendency of authors to cite themselves (and in this case, more authors) will result in increased citation rates.

Pros and Cons of the Impact Factor

Pros:

  • A vetted, established metric for measuring journal impact within a discipline.
  • Designed to eliminate bias based on journal size and frequency.
Cons:
  • Individual articles makes an uneven contribution to overall Impact Factor.
  • Impact Factor does not account for certain things, things like context (postive or negative citaion) and intentionality (self-citation).
  • The metric is proprietary to and bound by the contents of the Thomson Reuters database.
  • Citations, on which the Impact Factor is based, count for less than 1% of an article's overall use.

Criticism

Numerous critiques have been made regarding the use of impact factors. A 2007 study noted that the most fundamental flaw is that impact factors present the mean of data that are not normally distributed, and suggested that it would be more appropriate to present the median of these data. There is also a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers). Other criticism focuses on the effect of the impact factor on behavior of scholars, editors and other stakeholders. Others have made more general criticisms, arguing that emphasis on impact factor results from negative influence of neoliberal policies on academia claiming that what is needed is not just replacement of the impact factor with more sophisticated metrics for science publications but also discussion on the social value of research assessment and the growing precariousness of scientific careers in higher education.
Experts stress that there are limitations in using impact factors to evaluate a scholar's work. There are many reasons cited for not relying on impact factor alone to evaluate the output of a particular individual. Among these are the following:

  • A single factor is not sufficient for evaluating an author's work.
  • Journal values are meaningless unless compared within the same discipline. Impact factors vary among disciplines.
  • The impact factor was originally devised to show the impact of a specific journal, not a specific scholar. The quality and impact of the author's work may extend beyond the impact of a particular journal.
According to Jim Testa, a researcher for ThomsonReuters Scientific, the most widespread misuse of the Impact Factor is to evaluate the work of an individual author (instead of a journal). "To say that because a researcher is publishing in a certain journal, he or she is more influential or deserves more credit is not necessarily true. There are many other variables to consider." (interview 6/26/2008 in Thomson Reuters blog entry)

Child Development Perspectives
Journal Profile

About

Child Development Perspectives (CDP) emphasizes brief, well synthesized reviews of research, typically focusing on emerging lines of inquiry in developmental science. The journal sometimes publishes essays on policy, statistics and methods, and on other topics suitable for the readership. Papers are welcome from all fields that inform modern developmental science. Manuscripts reporting new empirical findings are not appropriate for CDP. Child Development Perspectives is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the Society for Research in Child Development. Its editor-in-chief is Rob Kail. The journal aims to publish short articles on emerging subjects of inquiry in developmental science. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2016 impact factor of 3.911, ranking it 8th out of 70 journals in the category Psychology, Developmental.

Highly Cited Keywords

ISSN
1750-8592
ISSN

The ISSN of Child Development Perspectives is 1750-8592 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

ISSN (Online)
1750-8606
ISSN (Online)

The ISSN (Online) of Child Development Perspectives is 1750-8606 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

Publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Publisher

Child Development Perspectives is published by Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd .

Publication Frequency
-
Publication Frequency

Child Development Perspectives publishes reports - .

Coverage
2008 - Present
Coverage

The Publication History of Child Development Perspectives covers 2008 - Present .

Open Access
NO
Open Access

Child Development Perspectives is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publishers.

Publication Fee
Publication Fee

There is no publication fee for submiting manuscript to Child Development Perspectives. Child Development Perspectives is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles.

Language
-
Language

The language of Child Development Perspectives is - .

Country/Region
United States
Country/Region

The publisher of Child Development Perspectives is Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd , which locates in United States .

Selected Articles

Full Title Authors
Full Title Authors
Discrepancies Between Adolescent and Parent Reports About Family Relationships Andres De Los Reyes · Christine McCauley Ohannessian · Sarah J. Racz · Sarah J. Racz
The Development of Lexical–Semantic Networks in Infants and Toddlers Erica H. Wojcik · Erica H. Wojcik
Bilingual Development in Children of Immigrant Families Erika Hoff · Erika Hoff
Insights on Social Behavior From Studying Williams Syndrome Adriana Sampaio · Jay Belsky · Isabel Soares · Ana Raquel Marcelino Mesquita · Ana Alexandra Caldas Osório · Óscar F. Gonçalves · Óscar F. Gonçalves · Óscar F. Gonçalves
A Life at the Intersection of Science and Social Issues Aletha C. Huston · Aletha C. Huston
Measuring Early Care and Education Quality Margaret Burchinal · Margaret Burchinal
Bystander Responses to Bias-Based Bullying in Schools: A Developmental Intergroup Approach Sally B. Palmer · Nicola Abbott · Nicola Abbott
From Developmental Psychologist to Water Scientist and Back Again: The Role of Interdisciplinary Research in Developmental Science Mary Gauvain · Mary Gauvain
The Social Glue of Cumulative Culture and Ritual Behavior Mark Nielsen · Mark Nielsen · Mark Nielsen
When and How Do Interactive Digital Media Help Children Connect What They See On and Off the Screen Heather L. Kirkorian · Heather L. Kirkorian
What Factors Facilitate Resilience in Developmental Dyslexia? Examining Protective and Compensatory Mechanisms Across the Neurodevelopmental Trajectory Xi Yu · Xi Yu · Jennifer Zuk · Jennifer Zuk · Nadine Gaab · Nadine Gaab · Nadine Gaab
Teaching and Learning Spelling Rebecca Treiman · Rebecca Treiman
Why Do Children Learn the Words They Do Nivedita Mani · Lena Ackermann · Lena Ackermann
An Introduction to the Approximate Number System Darko Odic · Ariel Starr · Ariel Starr
Preventing Unintentional Injuries to Young Children in the Home: Understanding and Influencing Parents Safety Practices Barbara A. Morrongiello · Barbara A. Morrongiello
Development of Appetite Self-Regulation: Integrating Perspectives From Attachment and Family Systems Theory Jaclyn A. Saltzman · Barbara H. Fiese · Kelly K. Bost · Brent A. McBride · Brent A. McBride
Why Effort Praise Can Backfire in Adolescence Jamie Amemiya · Ming-Te Wang · Ming-Te Wang
Perceptual Organization in Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder Kris Evers · Ruth Van der Hallen · Ilse Noens · Johan Wagemans · Johan Wagemans
The Development of Self and Identity in Adolescence: Neural Evidence and Implications for a Value-Based Choice Perspective on Motivated Behavior Jennifer H. Pfeifer · Elliot T. Berkman · Elliot T. Berkman
Perception of Face Race by Infants: Five Developmental Changes Paul C. Quinn · Kang Lee · Olivier Pascalis · Olivier Pascalis
Sexism in Childhood and Adolescence: Recent Trends and Advances in Research Campbell Leaper · Christia Spears Brown · Christia Spears Brown
Gendered Parenting in Early Childhood: Subtle But Unmistakable if You Know Where to Look Judi Mesman · Marleen G. Groeneveld · Marleen G. Groeneveld
Common ground and development Manuel Bohn · Manuel Bohn · Manuel Bohn · Bahar Köymen · Bahar Köymen
Beyond Pink and Blue: The Complexity of Early Androgen Effects on Gender Development Sheri A. Berenbaum · Sheri A. Berenbaum
Sociocultural Influences on the Sociopolitical Development of African American Youth Nkemka Anyiwo · Josefina Bañales · Stephanie J. Rowley · Daphne C. Watkins · Katie Richards-Schuster · Katie Richards-Schuster
Trauma and Long-Term Memory for Childhood Events: Impact Matters Gail S. Goodman · Jodi A. Quas · Deborah Goldfarb · Lauren Gonzalves · Alejandra Gonzalez · Alejandra Gonzalez
Early Relational Experience: A Foundation for the Unfolding Dynamics of Parent-Child Socialization Grazyna Kochanska · Lea J. Boldt · Kathryn C. Goffin · Kathryn C. Goffin
Inhibition and Mathematical Performance: Poorly Correlated, Poorly Measured, or Poorly Matched? Kerry Lee · Hon Wah Lee · Hon Wah Lee
From Interest to Obligation: The Gradual Development of Human Altruism Audun Dahl · Markus Paulus · Markus Paulus
Socioeconomic Inequality and the Developing Brain: Spotlight on Language and Executive Function Emily C. Merz · Cynthia A. Wiltshire · Kimberly G. Noble · Kimberly G. Noble
Leveraging Developmental Insights to Improve Early Childhood Education Anna J. Markowitz · Daphna Bassok · Bridget K. Hamre · Bridget K. Hamre
The Developmental Origins of the Perception and Production of Musical Rhythm Erin E. Hannon · Jessica E. Nave-Blodgett · Karli M. Nave · Karli M. Nave
From Babies to Robots: The Contribution of Developmental Robotics to Developmental Psychology Angelo Cangelosi · Angelo Cangelosi · Matthew Schlesinger · Matthew Schlesinger
Great Apes and Human Development: A Personal History Michael Tomasello · Michael Tomasello · Michael Tomasello
Development of Parent-Adolescent Relationships: Conflict Interactions as a Mechanism of Change Susan J. T. Branje · Susan J. T. Branje
Social robots for early language learning: Current evidence and future directions Junko Kanero · Vasfiye Geçkin · Vasfiye Geçkin · Cansu Oranç · Ezgi Mamus · Aylin C. Küntay · Tilbe Göksun · Tilbe Göksun
The Development of Selective Trust: Prospects for a Dual-Process Account Jonas Hermes · Tanya Behne · Hannes Rakoczy · Hannes Rakoczy
Challenges for Low-Income Children in an Era of Increasing Income Inequality Candice L. Odgers · Candice L. Odgers · Nancy E. Adler · Nancy E. Adler
Early Attachment Network with Mother and Father: An Unsettled Issue Or Dagan · Abraham Sagi-Schwartz · Abraham Sagi-Schwartz
Understanding Socioeconomic Differences in Parents Speech to Children Meredith L. Rowe · Meredith L. Rowe
How Evolution Constrains Human Numerical Concepts Jessica F. Cantlon · Jessica F. Cantlon
Neural and Cognitive Factors Influencing the Emergence of Psychopathology: Insights From the Bucharest Early Intervention Project Sonya Troller-Renfree · Charles H. Zeanah · Charles A. Nelson · Nathan A. Fox · Nathan A. Fox
Early Findings From the TransYouth Project: Gender Development in Transgender Children Kristina R. Olson · Selin Gülgöz · Selin Gülgöz
Youth‐Led Participatory Action Research: Overview and Potential for Enhancing Adolescent Development Emily J. Ozer · Emily J. Ozer
Callous–Unemotional Behaviors in Early Childhood: Measurement, Meaning, and the Influence of Parenting Rebecca Waller · Luke W. Hyde · Luke W. Hyde
Self-Control in Childhood: A Synthesis of Perspectives and Focus on Early Development Jeffrey R. Gagne · Jeffrey R. Gagne
Concern Over Internal, External, and Incidence Validity in Studies of Child‐Care Quantity and Externalizing Behavior Problems Eric Dearing · Henrik Daae Zachrisson · Henrik Daae Zachrisson
Identity Formation in Adolescence: The Dynamic of Forming and Consolidating Identity Commitments Elisabetta Crocetti · Elisabetta Crocetti
The Link Between Playing Video Games and Positive Youth Outcomes Paul J.C. Adachi · Teena Willoughby · Teena Willoughby
Genetic Syndromes and Developmental Risk for Autism Spectrum and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorders: Insights From Fragile X Syndrome Brianna R. Doherty · Gaia Scerif · Gaia Scerif
Developing Mathematics Knowledge Bethany Rittle-Johnson · Bethany Rittle-Johnson
The Emergence of Episodic Foresight and Its Consequences Thomas Suddendorf · Thomas Suddendorf
Prosocial Arousal in Children Robert Hepach · Robert Hepach
Continuity and Stability in Development Marc H. Bornstein · Diane L. Putnick · Gianluca Esposito · Gianluca Esposito · Gianluca Esposito
The Early Development of Human Aggression Dale F. Hay · Dale F. Hay
Affective Parenting Behaviors, Adolescent Depression, and Brain Development: A Review of Findings From the Orygen Adolescent Development Study Orli Schwartz · Julian G. Simmons · Sarah Whittle · Michelle L. Byrne · Marie B. H. Yap · Lisa Sheeber · Nicholas B. Allen · Nicholas B. Allen · Nicholas B. Allen
Making and Keeping Friends: The Importance of Being Similar Brett Laursen · Brett Laursen
Foundations of Reasoning About Social Dominance Anthea Pun · Susan A. J. Birch · Andrew Scott Baron · Andrew Scott Baron
Dealing With Social Difficulty During Adolescence: The Role of Implicit Theories of Personality David S. Yeager · David S. Yeager
The Development of Theory of Mind: Historical Reflections Henry M. Wellman · Henry M. Wellman
Interpersonal Development in Infancy: The Interconnectedness of Emotion Understanding and Social Cognition Peter J. Reschke · Eric A. Walle · Daniel Dukes · Daniel Dukes · Daniel Dukes
The Impact of Parenting on Emotion Regulation During Childhood and Adolescence Amanda Sheffield Morris · Michael M. Criss · Jennifer S. Silk · Benjamin J Houltberg Dr. · Benjamin J Houltberg Dr.
Enhancing Paternal Engagement in a Coparenting Paradigm Marsha Kline Pruett · Kyle D. Pruett · Carolyn Pape Cowan · Philip A. Cowan · Philip A. Cowan
Pattern Understanding: Relationships With Arithmetic and Reading Development Kelly Burgoyne · Kate Witteveen · Anne Tolan · Stephanie A. Malone · Charles Hulme · Charles Hulme
The Stony Brook Temperament Study: Early Antecedents and Pathways to Emotional Disorders Daniel N. Klein · Megan Finsaas · Megan Finsaas
Do Infants Really Experience Emotional Contagion Ted Ruffman · Benjamin Lorimer · Damian Scarf · Damian Scarf
Emotion and achievement during adolescence Reinhard Pekrun · Reinhard Pekrun
Understanding Processes of Peer Clique Influence in Late Childhood and Early Adolescence Wendy E. Ellis · Lynne Zarbatany · Lynne Zarbatany
New Directions and Challenges in Preventing Conduct Problems in Early Childhood Daniel S. Shaw · Lindsay Taraban · Lindsay Taraban
The Social Tasks of Friendship: Do Boys and Girls Excel in Different Tasks? Amanda J. Rose · Steven R. Asher · Steven R. Asher
Promoting Neuroprotective Care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units and Preterm Infant Development: Insights From the Neonatal Adequate Care for Quality of Life Study Rosario Montirosso · Edward Z. Tronick · Renato Borgatti · Renato Borgatti
Ecological Commitments: Why Developmental Science Needs Naturalistic Methods Audun Dahl · Audun Dahl
Teenage Mothers Today: What We Know and How It Matters Stefanie Mollborn · Stefanie Mollborn
U.S. Military Children and the Wartime Deployments of Family Members Shelley MacDermid Wadsworth · Keisha M. Bailey · Elizabeth Coppola · Elizabeth Coppola
Closing the 30 Million Word Gap: Next Steps in Designing Research to Inform Practice Annemarie H. Hindman · Barbara A. Wasik · Emily K. Snell · Emily K. Snell
Career Criminals and the Antisocial Life Course Matt DeLisi · Matt DeLisi
Linking Executive Functions and Procedural Metacognition Claudia M. Roebers · Emanuel Feurer · Emanuel Feurer
The Praise Paradox: When and Why Praise Backfires in Children With Low Self‐Esteem Eddie Brummelman · Eddie Brummelman · Jennifer Crocker · Brad J. Bushman · Brad J. Bushman · Brad J. Bushman
The Privileged Status of Category Representations in Early Development Andrei Cimpian · Andrei Cimpian
Latent Class Analysis for Developmental Research Stephanie T. Lanza · Brittany Rhoades Cooper · Brittany Rhoades Cooper
Cognitive Architecture of Belief Reasoning in Children and Adults: A Primer on the Two-Systems Account Jason Low · Ian A. Apperly · Stephen A. Butterfill · Hannes Rakoczy · Hannes Rakoczy
Physiological Responsivity and Executive Functioning: Implications for Adaptation and Resilience in Early Childhood Jelena Obradović · Jelena Obradović
Introducing Remote Enculturation: Learning Your Heritage Culture From Afar Gail M. Ferguson · Catherine L. Costigan · Christy V. Clarke · Julianna S. Ge · Julianna S. Ge
Early Life Stress: What Is the Human Chapter of the Mammalian Story? Megan R. Gunnar · Megan R. Gunnar
Princesses and Superheroes: Social-Cognitive Influences on Early Gender Rigidity May Ling Halim · May Ling Halim
Evidence for Intuitive Morality: Preverbal Infants Make Sociomoral Evaluations Julia W. Van de Vondervoort · J. Kiley Hamlin · J. Kiley Hamlin
Flexible Concern: The Development of Multidetermined and Context‐Dependent Empathic Responding Amrisha Vaish · Amrisha Vaish
Cross‐Cultural Perspectives on Declarative and Nondeclarative Memory From Infancy to Early Childhood Thorsten Kolling · Frauke Graf · Monika Knopf · Monika Knopf
The Development of Body Structure Knowledge in Infancy Ramesh S. Bhatt · Alyson Hock · Hannah White · Rachel Jubran · Ashley Galati · Ashley Galati
Continuity and Change in the Field of Cognitive Development and in the Perspectives of One Cognitive Developmentalist Robert S. Siegler · Robert S. Siegler
Mental Number Line in the Preliterate Brain: The Role of Early Directional Experiences Katarzyna Patro · Hans-Christoph Nuerk · Ulrike Cress · Ulrike Cress
Peer Rejection, Victimization, and Relational Self‐System Processes in Adolescence: Toward a Transactional Model of Stress, Coping, and Developing Sensitivities Melanie J. Zimmer-Gembeck · Melanie J. Zimmer-Gembeck
Prosocial Behavior in Infancy: The Role of Socialization Celia A. Brownell · Celia A. Brownell
Understanding Delay in Developmental Disorders Michael S. C. Thomas · Michael S. C. Thomas
Gender, Sexuality, and Gender Nonconformity: Understanding Variation in Functioning Alexa Martin-Storey · Alexa Martin-Storey
Strengthening Causal Inference in Developmental Research Portia Miller · Daphne Henry · Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal · Elizabeth Votruba-Drzal
Metacognition in Early Childhood: Fertile Ground to Understand Memory Development? Marie Geurten · Marie Geurten · Sylvie Willems · Sylvie Willems
A Lattice Model of the Development of Reading Comprehension Carol McDonald Connor · Carol McDonald Connor
Executive Function in Previously Institutionalized Children Emily C. Merz · Katia M. Harlé · Kimberly G. Noble · Robert B. McCall · Robert B. McCall
Beyond Cognition: Reading Motivation and Reading Comprehension Allan Wigfield · Jessica R. Gladstone · Lara Turci · Lara Turci
Critical Consciousness: A Developmental Approach to Addressing Marginalization and Oppression Matthew A. Diemer · Luke J. Rapa · Adam Voight · Ellen Hawley McWhirter · Ellen Hawley McWhirter
Cognitive Flexibility in Young Children: Beyond Perseveration Daniel J. Carroll · Emma Blakey · Lily FitzGibbon · Lily FitzGibbon
Intergenerational transmission of aggression: physiological regulatory processes Gayla Margolin · Michelle C. Ramos · Adela C. Timmons · Kelly F. Miller · Sohyun C. Han · Sohyun C. Han
The Debate Over Single‐Sex Schooling Erin Pahlke · Janet Shibley Hyde · Janet Shibley Hyde
Embodiment and Human Development Peter J. Marshall · Peter J. Marshall
Promoting Healthy Child Development via a Two‐Generation Translational Neuroscience Framework: The Filming Interactions to Nurture Development Video Coaching Program Philip A. Fisher · Tahl I. Frenkel · Laura K. Noll · Melanie Berry · Melissa Yockelson · Melissa Yockelson
Adolescent Pathways to Entrepreneurship Martin Obschonka · Martin Obschonka · Martin Obschonka
Current Understandings of What Works to Support the Development of Emergent Literacy in Early Childhood Classrooms Shayne B. Piasta · Shayne B. Piasta
Environmental Contaminants and Child Development Christopher J. Trentacosta · Pamela E. Davis-Kean · Colter Mitchell · Luke W. Hyde · Dana C. Dolinoy · Dana C. Dolinoy
Why Children Are Not Always Epistemically Vigilant: Cognitive Limits and Social Considerations Vikram K. Jaswal · Robyn L. Kondrad · Robyn L. Kondrad
How International Research on Parenting Advances Understanding of Child Development Jennifer E. Lansford · Marc H. Bornstein · Kirby Deater-Deckard · Kenneth A. Dodge · Suha M. Al-Hassan · Suha M. Al-Hassan · Dario Bacchini · Anna Silvia Bombi · Lei Chang · Bin-Bin Chen · Laura Di Giunta · Patrick S. Malone · Paul Oburu · Concetta Pastorelli · Ann T. Skinner · Emma Sorbring · Laurence Steinberg · Laurence Steinberg · Sombat Tapanya · Liane Peña Alampay · Liliana Maria Uribe Tirado · Arnaldo Zelli · Arnaldo Zelli
(Un)Real Animals: Anthropomorphism and Early Learning About Animals Megan S. Geerdts · Megan S. Geerdts

Discrepancies Between Adolescent and Parent Reports About Family Relationships
Child Development Perspectives | 2018
Andres De Los Reyes · Christine McCauley Ohannessian · Sarah J. Racz · Sarah J. Racz
Insights on Social Behavior From Studying Williams Syndrome
Child Development Perspectives | 2018
Adriana Sampaio · Jay Belsky · Isabel Soares · Ana Raquel Marcelino Mesquita · Ana Alexandra Caldas Osório · Óscar F. Gonçalves · Óscar F. Gonçalves · Óscar F. Gonçalves