Advances in Optics and Photonics
Journal Impact IF - Analysis · Trend · Prediction · Ranking


New

Journal Impact IF

2019-2020

14.69

5.2%

Journal Impact IF Trend

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Advances in Optics and Photonics

The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 14.69, which is just updated in 2020.

Advances in Optics and Photonics Impact Factor
Highest IF
23.4
Highest Journal Impact IF

The highest Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 23.4.

Lowest IF
9.688
Lowest Journal Impact IF

The lowest Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 9.688.

Total Growth Rate
-37.2%
IF Total Growth Rate

The total growth rate of Advances in Optics and Photonics IF is -37.2%.

Annual Growth Rate
-4.1%
IF Annual Growth Rate

The annual growth rate of Advances in Optics and Photonics IF is -4.1%.

Journal Impact IF Ranking

Subcategory Quartile Rank Percentile
Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics Q1 3/183

Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics 98%

Journal Impact IF Ranking

· In the Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics research field, the Quartile of Advances in Optics and Photonics is Q1. Advances in Optics and Photonics has been ranked #3 over 183 related journals in the Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics research category. The ranking percentile of Advances in Optics and Photonics is around 98% in the field of Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics.

Advances in Optics and Photonics Impact Factor 2020-2021 Prediction

Advances in Optics and Photonics Impact Factor Predition System

Advances in Optics and Photonics Impact Factor Prediction System is now online. You can start share your valuable insights with the community.

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Total Publications
154
Total Citations
22392

Annual Publication Volume

Annual Citation Record

International Collaboration Trend

Cited Documents Trend

Journal Impact IF History

Year Journal Impact IF
Year Journal Impact IF
2019-2020 14.69
2018-2019 13.963
2017-2018 21.286
2016-2017 17.833
2015-2016 12.368
2014-2015 10.111
2013-2014 9.688
2012-2013 16.059
2011-2012 23.4
Journal Impact IF History

· The 2019-2020 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 14.69
· The 2018-2019 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 13.963
· The 2017-2018 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 21.286
· The 2016-2017 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 17.833
· The 2015-2016 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 12.368
· The 2014-2015 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 10.111
· The 2013-2014 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 9.688
· The 2012-2013 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 16.059
· The 2011-2012 Journal Impact IF of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 23.4

Publications Cites Dataset

Year Publications Citations
Year Publications Citations
2008 0 4
2009 9 65
2010 10 283
2011 8 475
2012 8 754
2013 11 997
2014 11 1336
2015 14 1819
2016 13 2428
2017 16 2869
2018 15 2888
2019 20 4026
2020 19 4098
2021 0 350
Publications Cites Dataset

· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 0 reports and received 4 citations in 2008.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 9 reports and received 65 citations in 2009.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 10 reports and received 283 citations in 2010.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 8 reports and received 475 citations in 2011.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 8 reports and received 754 citations in 2012.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 11 reports and received 997 citations in 2013.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 11 reports and received 1336 citations in 2014.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 14 reports and received 1819 citations in 2015.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 13 reports and received 2428 citations in 2016.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 16 reports and received 2869 citations in 2017.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 15 reports and received 2888 citations in 2018.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 20 reports and received 4026 citations in 2019.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 19 reports and received 4098 citations in 2020.
· The Advances in Optics and Photonics has published 0 reports and received 350 citations in 2021.
· The total publications of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 154.
· The total citations of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 22392.

What is Impact Factor?

The impact factor (IF) or journal impact factor (JIF) of an academic journal is a scientometric index calculated by Clarivate that reflects the yearly average number of citations of articles published in the last two years in a given journal. It is frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher impact factor values are often deemed to be more important, or carry more intrinsic prestige in their respective fields, than those with lower values.

Advances in Optics and Photonics | Academic Accelerator - About the Impact Factor

Impact factor is commonly used to evaluate the relative importance of a journal within its field and to measure the frequency with which the “average article” in a journal has been cited in a particular time period. Journal which publishes more review articles will get highest IFs. Journals with higher IFs believed to be more important than those with lower ones. According to Eugene Garfield “impact simply reflects the ability of the journals and editors to attract the best paper available.” Journal which publishes more review articles will get maximum IFs. The Impact Factor of an academic journal is a scientometric Metric that reflects the yearly average number of citations that recent articles published in a given journal received. It is frequently used as a Metric for the relative importance of a journal within its field; journals with higher Impact Factor are often deemed to be more important than those with lower ones. The Advances in Optics and Photonics Impact Factor IF measures the average number of citations received in a particular year (2020) by papers published in the Advances in Optics and Photonics during the two preceding years (2018-2019). Note that 2020 Impact Factor are reported in 2021; they cannot be calculated until all of the 2020 publications have been processed by the indexing agency. New journals, which are indexed from their first published issue, will receive an impact factor after two years of indexing; in this case, the citations to the year prior to Volume 1, and the number of articles published in the year prior to Volume 1, are known zero values. Journals that are indexed starting with a volume other than the first volume will not get an impact factor until they have been indexed for three years. Occasionally, Journal Citation Reports assigns an impact factor to new journals with less than two years of indexing, based on partial citation data. The calculation always uses two complete and known years of item counts, but for new titles one of the known counts is zero. Annuals and other irregular publications sometimes publish no items in a particular year, affecting the count. The impact factor relates to a specific time period; it is possible to calculate it for any desired period. In addition to the 2-year Impact Factor, the 3-year Impact Factor, 4-year Impact Factor, 5-year Impact Factor, Real-Time Impact Factor can provide further insights and factors into the impact of Advances in Optics and Photonics.

History

The impact factor was devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). Impact factors are calculated yearly starting from 1975 for journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR). ISI was acquired by Thomson Scientific & Healthcare in 1992, and became known as Thomson ISI. In 2018, Thomson ISI was sold to Onex Corporation and Baring Private Equity Asia. They founded a new corporation, Clarivate, which is now the publisher of the JCR.

Use

The impact factor is used to compare different journals within a certain field. The Web of Science indexes more than 11,500 science and social science journals. Journal impact factors are often used to evaluate the merit of individual articles and individual researchers. This use of impact factors was summarised by Hoeffel:

Impact Factor is not a perfect tool to measure the quality of articles but there is nothing better and it has the advantage of already being in existence and is, therefore, a good technique for scientific evaluation. Experience has shown that in each specialty the best journals are those in which it is most difficult to have an article accepted, and these are the journals that have a high impact factor. Most of these journals existed long before the impact factor was devised. The use of impact factor as a measure of quality is widespread because it fits well with the opinion we have in each field of the best journals in our specialty....In conclusion, prestigious journals publish papers of high level. Therefore, their impact factor is high, and not the contrary.

Eugene Garfield

In brief, Impact factors may be used by:
  • Authors to decide where to submit an article for publication.
  • Libraries to make collection development decisions
  • Academic departments to assess academic productivity
  • Academic departments to make decisions on promotion and tenure.
As impact factors are a journal-level metric, rather than an article- or individual-level metric, this use is controversial. Garfield agrees with Hoeffel,but warns about the "misuse in evaluating individuals" because there is "a wide variation [of citations] from article to article within a single journal". Other things to consider about Impact Factors:
  • Many journals do not have an impact factor.
  • The impact factor cannot assess the quality of individual articles. Even if citations were evenly distributed among articles, the impact factor would only measure the interests of other researchers in an article, not its importance and usefulness.
  • Only research articles, technical notes and reviews are “citable” items. Editorials, letters, news items and meeting abstracts are “non-citable items”.
  • Only a small percentage of articles are highly cited and they are found in a small subset of journals. This small proportion accounts for a large percentage of citations.
  • Controversial papers, such as those based on fraudulent data, may be highly cited, distorting the impact factor of a journal.
  • Citation bias may exist. For example, English language resources may be favoured. Authors may cite their own work.
Moreover, informed and careful use of these impact data is essential, and should be based on a thorough understanding of the methodology used to generate impact factors. There are controversial aspects of using impact factors:
  • It is not clear whether the number of times a paper is cited measures its actual quality.
  • Some databases that calculate impact factors fail to incorporate publications including textbooks, handbooks and reference books.
  • Certain disciplines have low numbers of journals and usage. Therefore, one should only compare journals or researchers within the same discipline.
  • Review articles normally are cited more often and therefore can skew results.
  • Self-citing may also skew results.
  • Some resources used to calculate impact factors have inadequate international coverage.
  • Editorial policies can artificially inflate an impact factor.
Impact factors have often been used in advancement and tenure decision-making. Many recognize that this is a coarse tool for such important decisions, and that a multitude of factors should be taken into account in these deliberations. When considering the use of the impact factor (IF), keep these aspects in mind:
  • IF analysis is limited to citations from the journals indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge. Currently, the Web of Science indexes only 8621 journals across the full breadth of the sciences, and just 3121 in the social sciences.
  • A high IF/citation rate says nothing about the quality -- or even, validity -- of the references being cited. Notorious or even retracted articles often attract a lot of attention, hence a high number of citations. The notority related to the first publication on "cold fusion" is one such example.
  • Journals that publish more "review articles" are often found near the top of the rankings. While not known for publishing new, creative findings, these individual articles tend to be heavily cited.
  • The IF measures the average number of citations to articles in the journal -- given this, a small number of highly-cited articles will skew the figure.
  • It takes several years for new journals to be added to the list of titles indexed by the Web of Science/Web of Knowledge, so these newer titles will be under-represented.
  • It's alleged that journal editors have learned to "game" the system, encouraging authors to cite their works previously published in the same journal.
Comparing Journals Across Disciplines? Not a good idea! Using Impact Factors within a given discipline should only be done with great care, as described above. Using impact factor data to compare journals across disciplines is even more problematic. Here are some of the reasons:
  • Disciplines where older literature is still referenced, such as Chemistry and Mathematics, offer challenges to the methodolgy since older citations (older than two years) are not used to calculate the impact factor for a given journal. (Five-year impact factor analysis, which can be calculated using the Journal Citation Index database, helps smooth out this problem only to some degree.)
  • Different disciplines have different practices regarding tendency to cite larger numbers of references. Higher overall citation rates will bump upward impact factor measurements.
  • Where it's common for large numbers of authors to collaborate on a single paper, such as in Physics, the tendency of authors to cite themselves (and in this case, more authors) will result in increased citation rates.

Pros and Cons of the Impact Factor

Pros:

  • A vetted, established metric for measuring journal impact within a discipline.
  • Designed to eliminate bias based on journal size and frequency.
Cons:
  • Individual articles makes an uneven contribution to overall Impact Factor.
  • Impact Factor does not account for certain things, things like context (postive or negative citaion) and intentionality (self-citation).
  • The metric is proprietary to and bound by the contents of the Thomson Reuters database.
  • Citations, on which the Impact Factor is based, count for less than 1% of an article's overall use.

Criticism

Numerous critiques have been made regarding the use of impact factors. A 2007 study noted that the most fundamental flaw is that impact factors present the mean of data that are not normally distributed, and suggested that it would be more appropriate to present the median of these data. There is also a more general debate on the validity of the impact factor as a measure of journal importance and the effect of policies that editors may adopt to boost their impact factor (perhaps to the detriment of readers and writers). Other criticism focuses on the effect of the impact factor on behavior of scholars, editors and other stakeholders. Others have made more general criticisms, arguing that emphasis on impact factor results from negative influence of neoliberal policies on academia claiming that what is needed is not just replacement of the impact factor with more sophisticated metrics for science publications but also discussion on the social value of research assessment and the growing precariousness of scientific careers in higher education.
Experts stress that there are limitations in using impact factors to evaluate a scholar's work. There are many reasons cited for not relying on impact factor alone to evaluate the output of a particular individual. Among these are the following:

  • A single factor is not sufficient for evaluating an author's work.
  • Journal values are meaningless unless compared within the same discipline. Impact factors vary among disciplines.
  • The impact factor was originally devised to show the impact of a specific journal, not a specific scholar. The quality and impact of the author's work may extend beyond the impact of a particular journal.
According to Jim Testa, a researcher for ThomsonReuters Scientific, the most widespread misuse of the Impact Factor is to evaluate the work of an individual author (instead of a journal). "To say that because a researcher is publishing in a certain journal, he or she is more influential or deserves more credit is not necessarily true. There are many other variables to consider." (interview 6/26/2008 in Thomson Reuters blog entry)

Advances in Optics and Photonics
Journal Profile

About

Coverage encompasses comprehensive review articles and multimedia tutorials appropriate for students, researchers, faculty, business professionals and engineers. Authoritative content covers advances in all areas of optics and photonics from fundamental science to engineering applications, including materials, devices, and systems. Submissions of long reviews and tutorials are invited only. Tutorials feature interactive components such as animation and video to maximize their reach. None

Highly Cited Keywords

ISSN
1943-8206
ISSN

The ISSN of Advances in Optics and Photonics is 1943-8206 . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

ISSN (Online)
-
ISSN (Online)

The ISSN (Online) of Advances in Optics and Photonics is - . An ISSN is an 8-digit code used to identify newspapers, journals, magazines and periodicals of all kinds and on all media–print and electronic.

Publisher
The Optical Society
Publisher

Advances in Optics and Photonics is published by The Optical Society .

Publication Frequency
Quarterly
Publication Frequency

Advances in Optics and Photonics publishes reports Quarterly .

Coverage
2009-2019
Coverage

The Publication History of Advances in Optics and Photonics covers 2009-2019 .

Open Access
NO
Open Access

Advances in Optics and Photonics is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles. Anyone who wants to use the articles in any way must obtain permission from the publishers.

Publication Fee
Publication Fee

There is no publication fee for submiting manuscript to Advances in Optics and Photonics. Advances in Optics and Photonics is Subscription-based (non-OA) Journal. Publishers own the rights to the articles in their journals. Anyone who wants to read the articles should pay by individual or institution to access the articles.

Language
English
Language

The language of Advances in Optics and Photonics is English .

Country/Region
United States
Country/Region

The publisher of Advances in Optics and Photonics is The Optical Society , which locates in United States .

Selected Articles

Full Title Authors
Full Title Authors
Quantum plasmonics: new opportunity in fundamental and applied photonics Da Xu · Xiao Xiong · Lin Wu · Xi-Feng Ren · Ching Eng Png · Guang-Can Guo · Qihuang Gong · Yun-Feng Xiao · Yun-Feng Xiao
Modulation instability in dispersion oscillating fibers Arnaud Mussot · Matteo Conforti · Stefano Trillo · Francois Copie · Alexandre Kudlinski · Alexandre Kudlinski
Nonimaging optics: a tutorial R. Winston · Lun Jiang · Melissa N. Ricketts · Melissa N. Ricketts
Recent advances in high-contrast metastructures, metasurfaces, and photonic crystals Pengfei Qiao · Weijian Yang · Connie J. Chang-Hasnain · Connie J. Chang-Hasnain
Fundamentals of 3D imaging and displays: a tutorial on integral imaging, light-field, and plenoptic systems Manuel Martínez-Corral · Bahram Javidi · Bahram Javidi
Shaping light with nonlinear metasurfaces Shay Keren-Zur · Lior Michaeli · Haim Suchowski · Tal Ellenbogen · Tal Ellenbogen
Dynamically tunable and active hyperbolic metamaterials Joseph S. T. Smalley · Felipe Vallini · Xiang Zhang · Yeshaiahu Fainman · Yeshaiahu Fainman
AlGaN photonics: recent advances in materials and ultraviolet devices Dabing Li · Ke Jiang · Xiaojuan Sun · Chunlei Guo · Chunlei Guo
Light-sheet microscopy: a tutorial Omar E. Olarte · Jordi Andilla · Emilio J. Gualda · Pablo Loza-Alvarez · Pablo Loza-Alvarez
Toward ultimate efficiency: progress and prospects on planar and 3D nanostructured nonpolar and semipolar InGaN light-emitting diodes Yuji Zhao · Houqiang Fu · George T. Wang · Shuji Nakamura · Shuji Nakamura
Low-operating-energy directly modulated lasers for short-distance optical interconnects Shinji Matsuo · Takaaki Kakitsuka · Takaaki Kakitsuka
Optics technology for large-aperture space telescopes: from fabrication to final acceptance tests Isaac Trumper · Pascal Hallibert · Jonathan W. Arenberg · Hideyo Kunieda · Olivier Guyon · H. Philip Stahl · Dae Wook Kim · Dae Wook Kim
Nonlinear photonics with high-Q whispering-gallery-mode resonators Guoping Lin · Aurélien Coillet · Yanne K. Chembo · Yanne K. Chembo
Negative curvature fibers Chengli Wei · R. Joseph Weiblen · Curtis R. Menyuk · Jonathan Hu · Jonathan Hu
Losses in plasmonics: from mitigating energy dissipation to embracing loss-enabled functionalities Svetlana V. Boriskina · Thomas A. Cooper · Lingping Zeng · George Ni · Jonathan K. Tong · Yoichiro Tsurimaki · Yi Huang · Laureen Meroueh · Gerald Dennis Mahan · Gang Chen · Gang Chen
High-order optical nonlinearities in plasmonic nanocomposites—a review Albert S. Reyna · Cid B. de Araújo · Cid B. de Araújo
Picturing stimulated Raman adiabatic passage: a STIRAP tutorial Bruce W. Shore · Bruce W. Shore
Negative curvature fibers: publishers note Chengli Wei · R. Joseph Weiblen · Curtis R. Menyuk · Jonathan Hu · Jonathan Hu
Sensing with periodic nanohole arrays Andre-Pierre Blanchard-Dionne · Michel Meunier · Michel Meunier
Advances in stimulated Raman scattering in nanostructures L. Sirleto · Alessandro Vergara · M. A. Ferrara · M. A. Ferrara
Polarization, mirrors, and reciprocity: Birefringence and its compensation in optical retracing circuits Mario Martinelli · Paolo Martelli · Paolo Martelli
Theory and technology of SPASERs Malin Premaratne · Mark I. Stockman · Mark I. Stockman
New perspectives in face correlation research: a tutorial Q. Wang · A. Alfalou · Christian Brosseau · Christian Brosseau
Performance limits in optical communications due to fiber nonlinearity Andrew D. Ellis · Mary Elizabeth McCarthy · M.A.Z. Al Khateeb · Mariia Sorokina · Nick Doran · Nick Doran
Recent advances in plasmonic photonic crystal fibers: design, fabrication and applications Dora Juan Juan Hu · Ho-Pui Ho · Ho-Pui Ho
Raman spectroscopy: techniques and applications in the life sciences Dustin W. Shipp · Faris Sinjab · Ioan Notingher · Ioan Notingher
Optical security and authentication using nanoscale and thin-film structures Artur Carnicer · Bahram Javidi · Bahram Javidi
Nonlinear interferometers in quantum optics M. V. Chekhova · Z. Y. Ou · Z. Y. Ou
Inorganic nanoparticles for optical bioimaging Daniel Jaque · Cyrille Richard · Bruno Viana · Kohei Soga · Xiaogang Liu · José García Solé · José García Solé
Creation and detection of optical modes with spatial light modulators Andrew Forbes · Angela Dudley · Melanie McLaren · Melanie McLaren
Mode-locked semiconductor disk lasers Mahmoud Gaafar · Arash Rahimi-Iman · Ksenia A. Fedorova · W. Stolz · Edik U. Rafailov · Martin Koch · Martin Koch
Seeing cells in a new light: a renaissance of Brillouin spectroscopy Zhaokai Meng · Andrew J. Traverso · Charles W. Ballmann · Maria Troyanova-Wood · Vladislav V. Yakovlev · Vladislav V. Yakovlev
Molecular nonlinear optics: recent advances and applications Bobo Gu · Chujun Zhao · Alexander Baev · Ken-Tye Yong · Shuangchun Wen · Paras N. Prasad · Paras N. Prasad
Recent progress in semiconductor excitable lasers for photonic spike processing Paul R. Prucnal · Bhavin J. Shastri · Thomas Ferreira de Lima · Mitchell A. Nahmias · Alexander N. Tait · Alexander N. Tait
Ultralow-noise mode-locked fiber lasers and frequency combs: principles, status, and applications Jungwon Kim · Youjian Song · Youjian Song
Nonlinear light–matter interaction at terahertz frequencies D. Nicoletti · Andrea Cavalleri · Andrea Cavalleri · Andrea Cavalleri
Filtering light with nanoparticles: a review of optically selective particles and applications Todd P. Otanicar · Drew DeJarnette · Yasitha Hewakuruppu · Robert A. Taylor · Robert A. Taylor
Photoacoustics: a historical review Srirang Manohar · Daniel Razansky · Daniel Razansky
Optical properties of black phosphorus Xiaomu Wang · Shoufeng Lan · Shoufeng Lan
Diffraction gratings: from principles to applications in high-intensity lasers Nicolas Bonod · Jérôme Neauport · Jérôme Neauport

Quantum plasmonics: new opportunity in fundamental and applied photonics
Advances in Optics and Photonics | 2018
Da Xu · Xiao Xiong · Lin Wu · Xi-Feng Ren · Ching Eng Png · Guang-Can Guo · Qihuang Gong · Yun-Feng Xiao · Yun-Feng Xiao
Modulation instability in dispersion oscillating fibers
Advances in Optics and Photonics | 2018
Arnaud Mussot · Matteo Conforti · Stefano Trillo · Francois Copie · Alexandre Kudlinski · Alexandre Kudlinski
Nonimaging optics: a tutorial
Advances in Optics and Photonics | 2018
R. Winston · Lun Jiang · Melissa N. Ricketts · Melissa N. Ricketts